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Archive for August, 2013

Amber Point: Boise Valley Commercial Real Estate for Lease

Amber Point

Amber Point
1620 S. Topaz Way
Meridian, Idaho 83642

Amber Point – an approximately 8,200 square-foot Class A Meridian, Idaho structure – is part of the Silverstone Corporate Center, which is a 90-acre master planned employment center centrally located in the Boise Valley. Situated 1/2 mile from Interstate 84 at the Eagle Interchange, Silverstone Corporae Center features more than 1 million square feet of tenant amenities within minutes of the center including lodging, day care facilities, a fitness center, and a variety of restaurants. Silverstone also features a professional onsite business concierge available – www.silverstoneamenitycenter.com – to assist with all of your business planning and state-of-the-art meeting facilities designed to provide your business with everything you need to keep your company productive.

Amber Point has spaces starting at 1,300 square feet for lease with extensive perimeter and site landscaping, high visibility and access to Overland Road, consistent architecture throughout the park, minimum 5/1,000 parking ratio, and a generous $40/sf tenant improvement allowance on first generation space. Other highlights include:

Zoning: CC
Year Built: 2005
Number of Floors: One
Parking: 5/1,000 usable square feet
Ceiling: Lay-in acoustic ceiling panels in 2’x4’ T-bar ceiling grid with indirect and recessed lighting
Ceiling Height: 10 feet in office areas
Restrooms: Shared or private tenant restrooms throughout
Miscellaneous: All Sundance tenants have proportionate use of the Silverstone Amenity Center at no additional cost.

More information available about Amber Point at www.sundanceco.com or LoopNet.

About The Sundance Company

Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Is Real Estate Ready For Drones?

A CNN Money article discusses how dozens of companies have sprung up in the last few years making remote controlled, mini-aircraft mounted with cameras, that are increasingly being used for commercial and even entertainment purposes. But these aren’t the remote controlled helicopters you remember flying as a kid. Today’s drones are lighter, have better software, longer lasting batteries and vastly improved camera technology.

On the higher end of the cost spectrum are drones with high definition cameras that can operate a mile or more from the person flying it. They can cost tens of thousand of dollars, and are aimed at a variety of commercial uses.

Law enforcement agencies and border patrol are using them to keep tabs on suspected scofflaws. Journalists and sports photographers use them in lieu of expensive helicopters. Real estate agents employ them for aerial photos and video. Wildlife researchers and search-and-rescue outfits are using them or studying the potential. Even the utility industry is interested in having them hunt for downed power lines after a storm.

One of the most promising uses might be in agriculture, said Chris Anderson, former editor of Wired magazine who now runs the drone maker 3D Robotics.

3D Robotics makes a $500 drone that flies itself via GPS, scouring fields for information on crop conditions including water levels, pest infestations and other signs of trouble. Currently, Anderson said farmers pay $1,000 an hour for aircraft flyovers, a cost that’s prohibitively expensive.

“Farmers have no idea what’s going on in the fields,” said Anderson. “It can lead to over irrigation, over pesticide use, all sorts of problems.”

There is also a growing market for smaller, simpler drones marketed to kids and adults for recreational use. For example, the Parrot AR Drone, has a range of about 160 feet, is controlled by a smart phone app, and can be bought at Toys R Us for $300. It’s aimed at teens and adults that want an enhanced video game experience. Parrot said sales have already exceeded 500,000.

But the spread of the new technology is also raising a host of new issues.

While the American Civil Liberties Union is still finalizing its position on drones, the group has some reservations about how the technology could infringe on citizens’ rights.

“The technology of surveillance is becoming retail, and that will pose real challenges to our traditional notion of privacy,” said Catherine Crump, an ACLU attorney.

With ever-shrinking size and ever better camera technology, the group is concerned that people acting under the assumption that they’re in the privacy of their own homes or yards could be wrong.

While stalking laws or other measures would likely prevent someone from hovering a drone outside your bedroom window, “the airspace is something that anyone can fly through,” Crump said. “It’s not clear that there’s anything restricting someone from flying a drone over the property of others.

The Federal Aviation Administration was instructed by Congress in 2012 to open up the nation’s airspace to routine commercial drone use and is in charge of issuing permits for drones that operate at 400 feet or higher. Since 2009, the number of permits has more than doubled, going from 146 to 345 in 2012.

While the agency is still working up the rules, it has issued a fact sheet with current guidelines.

The FAA says drones that operate below 400 feet are subject to the same rules that govern model aircraft. Those essentially say the drones cannot be flown near populated areas, must stay within eyesight of the user, and cannot be used for commercial purposes, at least until the rules are finalized.

With real estate agents and journalists using drones, it appears those rules are being put to the test. An FAA spokesman said the agency “has investigated operations that appear to be commercial in nature.”

But industry advocates say it’s not just the government that should have access to this technology. Civilian drones represent a chance for citizens to monitor authority, as Occupy Wall Street protesters reportedly did last year with their drone dubbed “The Occucopter.”

“Laws to protect privacy would have to be drafted to protect people’s right to take photographs,” Crump said.

About The Sundance Company
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Why Should You Sit Up Straight?

For people who spend the day staring at a computer screen, slouching is fairly typical. But what is it doing to your spine, if anything? An article from the Wall Street Journal discusses if we need to sit up straight.

Stop for a second and notice the way you are sitting. Back curved, shoulders slumped, maybe legs crossed? For people who spend the day staring at a computer screen, this position is fairly typical. But what is it doing to your spine, if anything? Do we need to sit up straight to focus, like that mean math teacher once insisted? Here’s some straight talk from one expert, Mladen Golubic, medical director for the Center for Lifestyle Medicine at Cleveland Clinic’s Wellness Institute.

Degrees of Comfort
Little research has been done on the best way to sit upright. One American meta study in 1999 concluded that sitting at an angle of 110 to 130 degrees was optimal for spine comfort. A Scottish study published in 2007 found that leaning back at 135 degrees is ideal to prevent back strain. While interesting, this sort of precision may be impractical for most people, Dr. Golubic says.

Sitting to Death?
His clinic sees patients with multiple chronic illnesses. Nearly all of them sit for long periods each day. The term Sedentary Death Syndrome was coined by the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports in 2002 to address the growing consequences of a seated lifestyle. “There are studies on Sedentary Death Syndrome that show that sitting for hours can cause anything from lower back pain to high cholesterol, diabetes and obesity,” he says. In other words, no matter what position you’re sitting in all day, it is pretty bad for you.

The Perfect Pose
Body posture determines the efficiency of your breathing. “Relaxed, straight sitting”—with the core strong, shoulder blades active but not tight and spine erect—”expands your chest, allowing you to take in a larger breath…and you’ll have more energy and focus,” Dr. Golubic says. To achieve this, sit away from the back of your chair so you don’t slump, with your feet placed firmly on the ground. He sometimes sends patients home with a blue dot to put on their computer screens as a reminder to sit up straight and stretch and take a deep breath when they feel pain. There is also an app called PostureTrack that alerts users when they’re slumping.

Slump to a Hump
It’s not as though slouching will give you a hunchback in a day, but “if you do this day after day, and your muscles are not strong, the whole skeleton changes,” Dr. Golubic says. “I’m not aware of any studies that look at the changes in the volume of organs like the liver and spleen when you sit straight or slump forward. But we do know that when you slouch, you project an attitude of depression and low motivation.” When you sit up straight, he adds, “psychologically, your attitude is better.”

Core Message
If you’re not used to sitting up straight, you may feel lower back pain—an indicator that you need to strengthen your core and work on general fitness. Dr. Golubic almost always advises his patients to start yoga: “The first thing we learn in yoga is how to sit properly.”

Walk, Don’t Sit
The bottom line: How you sit is less important than how long you sit, Dr. Golubic says. He tries to get up from his desk often, doing “walking meetings” with colleagues and taking phone calls outdoors. “If you cannot walk,” he says, “At least stand.”

About The Sundance Company
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs in throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

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About The Sundance Company
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.