How to Stop Procrastinating

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Exceptions exist, but most of us can identify at least one area of our imperfect lives (whether it’s our health, home, work, or relationships), where, for no justifiable reason, we routinely delay doing that thing (or series of small thingies) that would improve the present moment or future.

Procrastination also appears to be as old as we are—academics have traced a history of philosophers grappling with the problem—so relying on a few hacks to deal with it seems naive. People love hacks, but they’re really only handy for treating procrastination as a symptom, the way small nudges—like hiding the cookie jar—can help people stick to a diet, without, arguably, changing their fundamental relationship with food.

Our guide, therefore, combines hacks with suggested tactics for designing your own more holistic approach to beating procrastination, one that examines all the deeper dynamics at work—the fear, the automatic coping strategies, the self-deception—when you put things off. All we ask is you…

Take the first (micro) step

Boom. You’ve done it. Not only did you click into this story, but you’ve also begun reading the first “tip,” rather than pinging the link to your Pocket or Evernote list to read later. Making that oh-so-tiny first move is an evidence-backed strategy for beating procrastination; the trick is setting the threshold for completion low—so low that the hedonist in you, who would rather feel good now and deal with real stuff later, won’t put up a fight.

Tim Pychyl, a psychologist and director of the Procrastination Research Group at Carleton University, in Ottawa, Canada, says that his group tested this approach in a small study and “found that once students got started, they appraised a task as less difficult and less stressful, even more enjoyable than they had thought,” he explains in an email to Quartz. “They said things like ‘I don’t know why I put it off, because it’s not so bad,’ and ‘I could have done a better job if I got started earlier.’”

Planning to get in shape by taking the stairs to work? Promise yourself you’re going to do just one flight. You’ll continue. Have a letter of recommendation to write? Tell yourself that all you have to do is open your laptop and reread the email requesting that letter, says Pychyl. As a bonus, completing that baby step will give a person a sense of accomplishment, which is fuel to continue.

Manage your emotions, not only your time

One common harbinger of oncoming procrastination is the belief that you should wait until you’re in the right mood to get something done. It’s a trap.

Joseph Ferrari, a professor of psychology at DePaul University in Chicago, has found that the “I’m not in the mood to do X” argument, which we’re all familiar with, can lead to a vicious cycle. The Atlantic once called it the “procrastination doom loop,” and described the stages: “I’ll do it later!” becomes “Ugh, I’m being so unproductive,” which turns into “Maybe I should think about starting this task…,” leading directly to “but I’m in the wrong mood to do it well,” so “I’ll do it later!” And so on.

The truth is, tossing aside a task because you’re “not in the mood” is actually a way of externally regulating your emotions—perhaps a fear of failure, of disappointing others, of losing some self-esteem, of not being perfect, says Fuschia Sirois, a psychologist and lecturer at the University of Sheffield in the UK. You may believe that procrastination is a time management issue, but really, “it’s just a way of coping with emotions that you’re ill-equipped to cope with,” she says. The dark feelings can be off-putting enough to be paralyzing, to send you looking for anything else you can do besides the task at hand, a reaction that’s often knee-jerk and unexamined.

Sirois suggests reflecting on the real reason that you’re procrastinating and turning to emotional regulation tactics—which could include reframing the way you see a situation (psychologists call it cognitive reappraisal) or naming the emotion you’re experiencing (labelling)—to deal with the underlying feelings that are triggering procrastination. Research has suggested that people with more developed abilities at regulating their emotions, and in particular those who can tolerate the unpleasant ones, are less likely to procrastinate. In other words, you may need a therapist, or you may need to figure out how to be your own therapist.

Name your delay: Is it really procrastination?

One easy solution to cutting down on all the procrastination in your life is to reclassify any delays that aren’t actually procrastination, thus clarifying your perspective on the problem. It could lift some unnecessary weight.

Delays come in all forms, and some are what Pychyl calls “sagacious delays.” They might give a person room to gather more information or get the sleep needed to refresh an overworked mind. Other delays are inevitable and may stem from other more pressing roles you play in your life, says Pychyl.

Consider the taxonomy of delays that Mohsen Haghbin, one of Pychyl’s former students, identified:

Inevitable delays, arising when one’s schedule is overloaded, or a crisis related to an obligation (as a parent, for example) knocks a person off track

Arousal delays, when a person delays a task because they enjoy the pressure of doing something at the last minute

Hedonistic delays, when a person chooses doing something instantly gratifying and pleasurable over the task at hand

Delays due to psychological problems, such as grieving or another mood or mental health condition, whether chronic or acute

Purposeful delays, when a person needs to, say, think about something before writing about it

Irrational delays, which are inexplicable to the procrastinator and often fueled by fear and anxiety

In practice, these categories are not mutually exclusive.

Correctly labelling a delay matters, because you can’t defeat an enemy if your image of it is in vague or muddied. Sometimes you may be intentionally pushing something into the future—let’s say postponing your delivery of a creative project— and calling it procrastination, when what you’re actually doing is allowing yourself time to think. But calling it “productive procrastination” could easily lead to real procrastination, Pychel theorizes, because, by its definition, procrastination impedes productivity.

Many people say they have made procrastination work for them, such as Tim Urban, author of the “Wait But Why” blog and a master procrastinator. Arguably, Leonardo Da Vinci did the same. According to the taxonomy above, however, what such people may actually have figured out for themselves is the value of arousal or purposeful delay. All the power to them, but intentional delays can worsen anxiety in those prone to it. Importantly, at least according to Pychyl, they’re not necessarily procrastinators in the truest sense and they likely don’t have to deal with the fallout from real procrastination. At work, for instance, chronic procrastination has been associated with lower salaries and lower rates of employment.

Practice “structured” procrastination

In 1996, John Perry, a Stanford University professor of philosophy, gave the procrastinators of the world a gift: a concept called “structured procrastination.”  (He has since written a book on the topic.) To procrastinate with structure involves putting the task that’s most daunting and somewhat urgent near the top of your list, but keeping your list filled with other equally valuable tasks that are less daunting to you.

Since procrastinators avoid whatever is near the top of their list, that’s where he suggests putting your most important task, and taking advantage of your urge to avoid it to tackle all the less important but still-valuable must-dos on your agenda. So, instead of getting next-to-nothing done as you put off writing that first draft of your looming presentation, you attack your messy office desk with cheerful fervor. As a bonus, your inner maverick—the one who wants you not to be such a mindless slave to your obligations— will feel acknowledged.

Perry also suggested padding your list of to-dos with the minor accomplishments you probably would have pulled off anyway, like “make coffee” or “shut off alarm,” just to give yourself those dopamine hits from tiny wins.

He wrote in his original essay on the topic:

Procrastinators often follow exactly the wrong tack. They try to minimize their commitments, assuming that if they have only a few things to do, they will quit procrastinating and get them done. But this approach ignores the basic nature of the procrastinator and destroys his most important source of motivation. The few tasks on his list will be, by definition, the most important. And the only way to avoid doing them will be to do nothing. This is the way to become a couch potato, not an effective human being.

It’s all a mind game you play with yourself, but proponents say it works.

Time travel to your future self

When a New Year’s resolution fails, we rarely hold a back-of-the-brain, post-mortem meeting to examine why. If we did, we’d often discover that we’d made a mistake when we imagined the future: we saw it as different from today, free of the burdens that make exercise or organizing our files feel so totally impossible to achieve this week. But we don’t ask why Monday would be any different.

“We believe this future me of tomorrow or next week will have more energy, more willpower to follow through on this task that feels threatening to me,” says Sirois, “but we don’t really change that much in that time frame.” It’s a ruse that only leads to more stress, she adds.

Eve-Marie Blouin-Hudon, a psychology researcher at Carleton University, has developed a guided visualization exercise—to be practiced daily for 10 minutes—to help people feel more connected to their future self, to see that they are largely one and the same, and to thus be kinder to that person. To begin, you would choose the area in which you most need to stop procrastinating. Then begin to imagine yourself at a certain “deadline” time in the future, and get specific about the details: Where are you? What are you wearing? How do you feel? What words do you see in an email to you about this task? Although Blouin-Hudon’s script was written for students, it can serve at a blueprint for a personalized exercise.

We have a wonderful ability to “see” the past, present, and future, so why not use it, says Blouin-Hudon. Her work and that of others have suggested that shoring up one’s sense of “future-self continuity” can lead to less procrastination.

Make plans to work around the “The hell with it” effect

Once you’re committed to not procrastinating, you may still encounter moments when, facing an unexpected turn of events, you’ll be tempted to return to your old friend, your trusted escape, procrastination.

For instance, you’re planning to cycle to work, but when you open the garage door, you find that it’s raining, writes Thomas Webb, another psychologist at University of Sheffield, in his Psychology Today blog, “The Road To Hell.” Suddenly your will power is stretched, and your good intention is vulnerable to collapsing under what Webb calls “‘the hell with it’ effect.” As in “The hell with it. I can ride to work tomorrow.”

But, he explains, your intentions will have a fighting chance if you have enacted an “if-then” plan, a specific type of behavior change technique, developed by psychologist Peter Gollwitzer.  The “if-then” method ensures that you’ve spent some time thinking about what headwinds you might encounter and how you’ll react to them. Rather than give up when a challenge arises, writes Webb, “the person would quickly and relatively automatically think about how good they will feel about themselves if they cycle and find themselves rolling down the road looking forward to these feelings.”

Behavior change, as a category of study, is loaded with techniques like this, Webb points out. Among the dozens of options, the if-then plan has the most evidence to suggest that it’s durable enough to protect a commitment during a stress test.

It can pay to attend to your physical and mental environment, too, to minimize the number of critical moments that might possibly be encountered. If your mind perceives a silently vibrating phone as a cue to start scrolling through Instagram, turn the appliance off. (Seems obvious, but how often do we do it?) If your colleague’s mood feels contagious and counterproductive, create some distance.

Avoid berating oneself

Negative emotions can be motivating, until they’re not. When you’re so immersed in a crappy feeling, like shame or fear, you can’t take an objective view of the situation, says Sirois. “When procrastinators feel bad, they’re feeling bad not just about the things they’re currently procrastinating on, but they’re remembering all the times they procrastinated before,” Sirois explains, “so it feeds back into feeling negative, which feeds back into wanting to avoid whatever the task is all together.”

A range of exercises exist to help a person recognize and become less controlled by self-defeating emotions, she says, whether through forgiveness, or more subtly, self-compassion, her focus of academic research. For instance, you might first recall a past incident when you procrastinated, and life was not okay in the end. Then write a note to yourself, as if you were writing to a friend, reassuring that person that what they did was not immoral or inexcusable. “We’re a lot kinder to other people who are struggling than we are to ourselves,” she adds. “We all default to self-critical.”

Sirois’s experiments suggest that normalizing your past mistakes this way seems to “brings down the threshold of those emotions, so that you can get on with things, rather than having to deal with the way you’re feeling.”

Simply tell yourself, “Look, you were not the first person to procrastinate,” she says, “and you won’t be the last.”

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Quartz at Work website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

 

7 Ways To Generate New Ideas

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The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

CRE Conferences to Attend in 2020

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Real estate professionals know that prospecting, nurturing relationships and networking are crucial for success in commercial real estate. One of the best (and most fun!) ways to network with a lot of people in a short amount of time is by attending industry events and conferences.

Conferences provide an opportunity to meet with people you might not otherwise meet in your local market. Beyond that, they often feature highly regarded industry speakers and continuing education sessions that keep you up to date on the latest trends and boost your industry knowledge. While there are many conferences to choose from, here are the top 8 that we think brokers should check out in 2020.

  1. SIOR 360 Conferences

April 29-May 2 | Indian Wells, CA (TransACT 360)
October 22-24 | Boston, MA (CREate 360)

The SIOR World Conferences have long been considered the most important events of the year for SIOR designees and others involved in the sale or lease of commercial real estate. For 2020, SIOR has rebranded the conferences and instead of “Spring” and “Fall,” they will be called “TransACT 360” and “CREate 360.” During the former, attendees will acquire tactical deal-making skills to be able to conduct business right away. During the latter, attendees will hear from high-profile speakers and engage in strategic discussions about the industrial and office real estate landscape.

  1. ICSC RECon

May 17-19 | Las Vegas Convention Center, Las Vegas, NV

It’s on the list every year….and if you work in retail real estate, you need to be there every year! RECon is the largest global gathering of retail real estate professionals. At RECon 2020, attendees will engage in three days of deal making, hear perspectives from industry experts and key note speakers, partake in professional development/career-building opportunities, and more.

  1. CREW Network Convention and Marketplace

September 15-17 | Fairmont Austin, Austin, TX

The CREW (Commercial Real Estate Women) Network Convention and Marketplace brings together more than 1,200 commercial real estate leaders annually for deal making, networking, industry education, and leadership development. Attend this event to learn about the latest trends and technologies in the CRE industry. Speakers and schedule of events TBA.

  1. NAIOP CRE.Converge

October 6-8 | Caesars Palace Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV

NAIOP (National Association for Industrial and Office Parks) hosts this annual conference where attendees are challenged to think of new ways to conduct business, build relationships, and make deals. 2019 attendees said that it’s a unique opportunity to talk to your competition as colleagues and share information with each other. The event will feature networking, tours, speakers, and more.

  1. Mortgage Bankers Association Annual Convention and Expo

October 18-21 | Hyatt Regency Chicago, Chicago, IL

Real estate finance professionals can attend this annual gathering to learn from industry innovators and experts. Hundreds of exhibitors will be present, giving you hands-on access to the latest products and services. Plus, receive insights and strategies for success from MBA advocates so you can grow your business.

  1. CoreNet Global Summit

October 25-28 | Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, Washington, D.C.

CoreNet Global Summit attracts 2,000 attendees working in the corporate real estate space. Every CoreNet Global Summit offers opportunities to network, learn and be recognized for your achievements. The theme for next year is all about how relationships are fundamental to creating digital and physical integration at work, connecting people, place, and technology.

  1. National Association of REALTORS® Conference & Expo

November 13-16 | New Orleans, LA

Approximately 20,000 sales agents, associate brokers, broker-owners, and real estate office staff attend this annual event. Though they all come from a wide variety of real estate backgrounds, they are all successful in their marketplace. The National Association of REALTORS® is accepting speaker proposal submissions until December 10, 2019.

  1. CCIM Global Conference

TBA

CCIM (Certified Commercial Investment Member) Institute’s annual global conference brings top commercial real estate professionals together to trade ideas that help shape the future of the industry. In 2019 they covered hot topics like crowdfunding and big data. Though 2020’s dates and location are yet to be announced, this is an industry event you won’t want to miss. We’ll be sure to update this post once more information is released.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the apto website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

 

Happy Thanksgiving 2019

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The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

How To Focus On What’s Important, Not Just What’s Urgent

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Do you get to the end of the day and feel that you’ve met your most pressing deadlines but haven’t accomplished anything that’s fundamentally important? You’re hardly alone. In a series of studies recently published in the Journal of Consumer Research, people typically chose to complete tasks that had very short deadlines attached to them, even in situations in which tasks with less pressing deadlines were just as easy and promised a bigger reward.

It’s natural to want to get deadline-driven tasks squared away and off your mental to-do list. A paradox many people face is that our most meaningful tasks are less likely to have deadlines than tasks that are relatively unimportant. Your important priorities might relate to:

  • enacting your values (for example, volunteering or spending more time with your children)
  • achieving public recognition (getting invited to sit on industry panels or writing a book)
  • improving vital skills (upping your knowledge of statistics or learning a new language)
  • averting disasters (scheduling an annual checkup at the doctor or creating a crisis management protocol for your business)

If you’re like most people, these priorities slip to the back of your mind while you work on low-importance, time-specific tasks, such as booking a hotel room for a conference, clearing out your email inbox, or writing a monthly newsletter.

So, what can you do? I’ve put together a list of practical strategies and tips but know that none of these suggestions is going to lead to your making perfect choices. Aiming for perfection is what causes people to stay stuck. Instead, implement strategies that will incrementally move you in the right direction but don’t require much effort.

Schedule Important Tasks, and Give Yourself Way More Time Than You’ll Need

Research shows that scheduling when and where you’ll do something makes it dramatically more likely that the task will get done.

For very important and long-avoided tasks, I like a strategy that I call “clearing the decks,” which means assigning a particular task to be the only one I work on for an entire day. I recently used this strategy to get myself to set up a password manager, something I’d been putting off for literally years.

Unfamiliar but important tasks often have a learning curve that makes how much time they’ll take to complete unpredictable. Working on them often feels more clumsy than efficient, which is another subtle factor in why we don’t do them. The “clear the decks” strategy of allowing yourself a full day, even when that seems excessive, can be useful in these cases.

So that you don’t put off important personal care, try having a designated time slot once a week that’s available for you to make a personal appointment during work hours, should this be necessary. This can help ensure you get medical issues investigated early. Most weeks the slot will go unused, but keep it walled off for when the need arises.

Isolate the Most Impactful Elements of Important Tasks

Big tasks often require incremental progress. Coming back to the password manager example, my initial goal had been to create new, strong, and unique passwords for all my online accounts, but this wasn’t absolutely necessary. It made the most sense to start with my 10 to 20 most valuable accounts.

If you habitually set goals so lofty you end up putting them off, try this: When you consider a goal, also consider a half-size version. Mentally put your original version and the half-size version side by side and ask yourself which is the better (more realistic) goal. If your task still feels intimidating, shrink it further until it feels doable. You might end up with a goal that’s one-fourth or one-tenth the size of what you initially considered but that’s more achievable — and once you start, you can always keep going.

Anticipate and Manage Feelings of Anxiety

Many important tasks involve tolerating thinking about things that could go wrong, which is anxiety-provoking. Examples: making a will, investigating a lump, succession planning for your business, actually reading your insurance policies, or creating that crisis management plan.

Even when tasks don’t involve contemplating catastrophes, those that have the potential for large payoffs in the future commonly involve tolerating anxiety. General examples of important but potentially anxiety-provoking tasks include: developing new friendships, doing something challenging for the first time, asking for what you want, having awkward conversations, facing up to and correcting mistakes, and chipping away at large, multi-month tasks where you need to tolerate fluctuating self-confidence and doubt throughout the project.

Broadly speaking, working on important things typically requires having good skills for tolerating uncomfortable emotions. Here’s a personal example: Reading the work of writers who are better than I am is useful for improving my skills, but it triggers envy and social comparison. Acknowledging and labeling the specific emotions that make an experience emotionally challenging is a basic but effective step for reducing those emotions.

You’ll be better able to pursue goals that involve going outside your psychological comfort zone if you have top-notch skills for managing your thoughts and emotions.

Spend Less Time on Unimportant Tasks

Unimportant tasks have a nasty tendency of taking up more time than they should. For example, you might sit down to proofread an employee’s report — but before you know it, you’ve spent an hour rewriting the whole thing. In the future, you might decide to limit yourself to making your three most important comments on any piece of work that’s fundamentally acceptable or give yourself a time limit for how long you’ll spend providing notes.

Having strategies for making quicker decisions can help too. When you’ve got a pressing decision to make, it can be better to make a quick decision than a perfect one that takes more time.

Prioritize Tasks That Will Reduce Your Number of Urgent but Unimportant Tasks

In modern life, it’s easy to fall into the trap of being “too busy chasing cows to build a fence.” The sorts of scenarios you most want to avoid are fixing the same problems over and over or giving the same instructions repeatedly. To overcome a pattern of spending all day “chasing cows,” you can outsource, automate, batch small tasks, eliminate tasks, streamline your workflow, or create templates for recurring tasks. Look for situations in which you can make an investment of time once to set up a system that will save you time in the future, such as setting up a recurring order for office supplies rather than ordering items one at a time as you run out.

One specific strategy I cover in The Healthy Mind Toolkit is retraining the “decision leeches” in your life. Decision leeches are people who defer decisions to you. For example, you might ask someone else to decide, but instead of doing it, they email you a list of options for you to look at, putting the responsibility back on you. Instead of automatically answering the person, ask them to make a clear recommendation.

Pay Attention to What Helps You See (and Track) the Big Picture

When we’re head-down in the grind, it’s hard to have enough mental space to see the big picture. Pay attention to what naturally helps you do this. Something that helps me is travel, especially taking flights alone. There’s nothing like a literal 10,000-foot view to give me a clearer perspective on my path. Spreadsheets help me see the big picture too. As much as I hate bookkeeping and taxes, doing them helps me pay attention to and optimize my overall situation. Taking more breaks can help stop you going down the rabbit hole of spending a lot of time on unimportant things without realizing that’s what you’re doing.

Another thing that helps keep me focused on my important goals is catching up with colleagues I see every six months or so. Invariably this involves giving each other an update on what we’ve been doing and what we’re trying to get done. Likewise, when it comes to money, there are certain personal finance bloggers I like to read from time to time to help me stay on track.

Tracking your time use can help too, but the downside is that tracking itself takes time and willpower. I use the RescueTime app to effortlessly track how much time I’m spending on different websites (including Gmail). Then I take a quick glance at the report each week.

Whatever helps you see the big picture, don’t skip those things. Also, give yourself time after those activities to figure out how you’re going to translate your insights into specific plans and actions.

If you’re struggling with prioritizing the important over the urgent, don’t be too hard on yourself. The number of deadlines and decisions we face in modern life, juxtaposed with the emotionally (and cognitively) challenging nature of many important tasks, makes this struggle an almost universal one. I’ve written entire books on how to focus on the big picture and stop self-sabotaging, and I still find it difficult. I consider success as taking my own advice at least 50% of the time! This is a reasonable rule of thumb that you might adopt, too.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Harvard Business Review website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

 

Time Management Tips For Your Personality

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The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Podcasts That CRE Professionals Should Follow

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Last year apto published 6 commercial real estate podcasts you should be following. While these are still great ones to give a listen, they’ve rounded up four more that we think commercial real estate professionals would benefit from.

From interviews with commercial real estate brokers and tech executives on the state of the industry to best practices for CRE investing, to useful and unique sales tactics, we hope there’s something on this list for everyone.

 

  1. Commercial Real Estate with a Little Attitude

This podcast is hosted by Duke Long, owner, and broker of The Duke Long Agency. Long has delivered numerous presentations and participated in/hosted panel discussions about commercial real estate technology, communication, marketing, branding, data, content creation, and digital media. In Commercial Real Estate with a Little Attitude, he sits down with prominent brokers and various CRE tech executives to discuss their perspectives on the state of the industry. But beware! This podcast is not for the faint of heart or something you’d want your children overhearing. It’s got attitude and F-bombs galore but is sure to get you thinking and talking.

 

  1. The Apartment Building Investing Podcast

Entrepreneur and author Michael Blank shares what works and what doesn’t in the world of commercial real estate investing. And with a new episode released every week, there are plenty of secrets to be learned.  Blank has been investing in residential and multifamily real estate since 2005 and began syndicating deals in 2010. His main mission? To show people how they can become financially free in the next three to five years (or sooner) by doing their first apartment building deal.

 

  1. We Study Billionaires

This podcast comes from the Investor’s Podcast Network. While not specific to commercial real estate, it’s no secret that CRE brokers are financially motivated and, who doesn’t dream of becoming a billionaire? Hosts Preston Pysh and Stig Brodersen study self-made billionaires like Warren Buffet and Ray Dalio and share ways you can adopt their processes and tactics, especially when it comes to investing and the stock market. And if you aren’t into investing now (or ever), the content is at least inspirational and motivating.

 

  1. The Salesman Podcast

Hosted by Will Barron, The Salesman Podcast is the world’s most downloaded B2B sales and selling podcast. While commercial real estate is all about relationships, every broker must be at his/her core a good salesman/saleswoman. Whether you’re prospecting for new business, have been struggling to close the same deal for two years, or are trying to think of something witty and eye-catching to say in an email to an old client, this podcast has something for you.  Barron interviews the world’s leading influence, body language, psychology, and sales experts to give you the information you need to close more deals, make more money, and really thrive in sales.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the apto website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.