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The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

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How to Conduct a Productive Brainstorming Session

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Brainstorming has gained a foothold across a wide array of disciplines, industries, and work setups. However, many people have a limited view of the process, not realizing there’s more than one way to do it.

Broadly, brainstorming tasks an individual, or more commonly a group, with working toward a conclusion or solution for a problem by tossing different ideas into the ring. More succinctly, brainstorming is a creative idea-generating process.

Curious to learn how to elevate your next brainstorming session? Continue reading to discover the origins of this idea-generating method, plus techniques on how to lead or participate in a brainstorming session.

The benefits of brainstorming

The advantages of brainstorming go beyond just finding a solution to a problem. Structured yet spontaneous group collaboration can benefit workers in a variety of ways.

  • It inspires creativity. Brainstorming can spark creativity when team members riff on and help shape each other’s ideas. In fact, research suggests that when two not-so-creative individuals work together on a creative problem, their cooperation with one another enhances creative performance.
  • It can be used as a teaching-learning tool. Research shows that brainstorming is effective teaching—and learning—tool. Participants in one study found that brainstorming was a helpful technique for postgraduate medical biochemistry students to understand new concepts, even combatting the “drawbacks of traditional teaching.” 
  • It fosters team building. According to a 2017 study, team members report higher levels of satisfaction not just in the act of brainstorming itself, but in the convergence stage (when they narrow down many ideas to a handful of the best ones).
  • It provides a judgment-free environment for idea generation. Research suggests brainstorming session ideas tend to improve once everyone gets warmed up. Plus, working as a team can help employees feel more secure, supported, and willing to take more risks. 

Helpful guidelines for successful brainstorming sessions

One of the keys to an effective brainstorming session is to get everyone involved. But there are plenty of other components that contribute to great idea generation as well.

Before you host your next ideation session, take note of these helpful suggestions.

  • Send out the problem(s) and expectations beforehand. Before you meet, consider sending everyone a brief description of the problem they’ll be brainstorming solutions for. On that same note, you can also prep everyone for a productive session by refreshing them on the goals of the brainstorming, plus the type of brainstorming the meeting will entail.
  • Bring together a diverse group. We all have different perspectives and lived experiences. So why not take advantage of varying viewpoints and backgrounds? As dictated by your end goal, that can mean assembling individuals of differing ages, genders, or nationalities. Or, depending on what you brainstorm, it may be a good idea to invite colleagues from different departments, too. Once you have your team assembled, remind everyone to remain open to different experiences and ideas.
  • Give people time to develop ideas alone. Some people prefer when they get to ideate on their own first. By making space for individual and group ideation, you can help participants focus, flesh out several completely different trains of thought, and benefit from getting all hands-on deck once you come together as a group to build on the initial ideas.
  • Provide a place to draw or sketch. If you conduct an in-person brainstorming session, you may want to use a communal smartboard or dry-erase board so team members can sketch out ideas and have the flexibility to erase them. Alternatively, you can take a more old-school approach with a large easel pad.
  • Allow everyone to chime in. Encourage everyone to voice their ideas—even if an idea isn’t fully developed yet. Equally as important, remind everyone to stay positive and supportive. Rather than knock down or dismiss an idea, treat every thought with equal respect.
  • Record every idea. In the same vein, jotting down every idea demonstrates to the team that all viewpoints are welcome and valuable. Plus, you never know which ideas will make their way past the cutting room floor when it’s time to evaluate.

Proven brainstorming techniques

To spark creativity and enter your next brainstorming session with a plan, consider trying one of these proven idea-generating techniques.

  • The 6-3-5 method. This brainstorming technique requires a team of six people. Each team member receives a sheet of paper with a three-by-six table and writes down three ideas across the top row. After three minutes, the participants pass the sheets of paper clockwise before writing down three more new ideas inspired by the existing row of ideas. The passing of the idea sheets continues five times until all the rows contain ideas.
  • Mind mapping
    Though there are several distinct methods under the mind-mapping umbrella, this technique always starts with a graphical representation of information. Brainstormers organize ideas with a central image (a title or main idea) with subsequent ideas branching off and even more ideas stemming from the branches.
  • Role storming. This brainstorming method is built on the premise of identity swapping. The goal is for team members to feel more comfortable and creative by stepping into someone else’s shoes and brainstorming as if they were the person assigned to them. Often, taking new roles and responsibilities (even hypothetically) can spur new ideas.
  • Round robin. Though brainstorming was founded on teamwork, taking a round-robin approach allows people to come up with ideas without being directly influenced by another person in the room. To start, each team member writes down initial ideas on a card without discussing them with the group. And then, just like the 6-3-5 method (but minus the three-by-six table), everyone passes their idea card to the person next to them who will use those ideas as inspiration. In the end, a facilitator will eliminate any duplicate ideas before discussing and narrowing down the top contenders.
  • Reverse brainstorming. Reverse brainstorming flips traditional brainstorm on its head. Rather than ideate solutions to a problem out of the gate, team members ideate ways they could cause or exacerbate that problem. Once the team brainstorms all the ways they could create the posed problem, they work together to reverse the ideas into potential solutions.

Conclusion

Brainstorming is not only a creative way to break up the workday, but it’s also an important strategic tool for companies to conjure up novel ideas and new approaches for conducting business. Keep these guidelines and techniques in mind to find what works best for you and your team. Just remember that each problem you bring to a brainstorming session may benefit from a different process.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Quill website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

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The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

How to Reduce Email Anxiety

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Email clutter and perpetual access to messages are the norm for nearly everyone. Unfortunately, this unrelenting chaos invades work inboxes, too; it is not uncommon for work or business-important emails to fall by the wayside.  

According to Mailbird’s Email Overload Survey, 40% of workers receive roughly 61-100 emails every day, but only around 10% of them have any relevance to their workload.  

As a result, critical work-related emails can be hard to find. One third of workers surveyed said they need to spend three to five hours per week managing their email inboxes — 39% say they spend more than six hours per week managing emails.   

When workers must spend considerable time digging through their inboxes to find relevant emails, it becomes frustrating and time-wasting. Workers could undoubtedly spend six-plus hours each week doing more productive and meaningful activities.  

No escape from email stress 

It is evident from Mailbird’s research that part of the stress related to work emails comes from their perpetual accessibility through smartphones. 

Before the internet, emails and smartphones, time outside of work hours was typically a break from seeing work-related materials. It was customary to associate that time with intrinsically reducing stress levels.   

Things are much more complicated than that now because of constant access to emails on smartphones, which most people carry with them all day.  

For example, if a few hours go by without checking emails, most workers (71.1%) will not become stressed. However, that lowers to just half (51.6%) when workers ignore emails for a whole weekend; and a mere 15.6% when a week has passed with neglecting emails.  

In other words, there is a strong correlation between the duration of time workers do not look at their work-related emails and stress levels.  

This type of correlation is not unique to the age of modern technology. For example, Friedrich Nietzsche’s philosophy from the late 19th century suggests that it is an essential attribute of human nature to become uneased by such inactivity from work.  

Constant email access has amplified this correlation of stress and inactivity with work; 48.8% of workers rank missing out on critical work-related emails as the deepest concern in relation to stress from not checking emails. However, this problem is essentially tied to workers’ cluttered emails.  

Organize and eliminate to decrease stress 

Here are two strategies to cope with cluttered email inboxes and lower stress.  

1. Deleting work-related apps 

The first strategy worth considering is deleting all work-related materials from your phone and letting others at work know you’ve done so.  

“It is stressful to feel the need to check all the time.” Saying something like this will get others to understand and respect your choice in most workspaces; work-related emails are rarely important enough that they cannot wait until workers are in the office during work hours to see them.  

When you’ve established such a norm with yourself and your colleagues, the exterior standard of needing to check emails outside of work hours will likely have less of an influence and, therefore, will produce less stress.  

2. Managing email inbox size and inputs. 

In some workspaces, however, constant contact is non-negotiable. In these and all other cases, managing email inbox size and inputs is critical. However, spending several hours a week doing so is untenable and needs a viable and widely applicable alternative.   

Of the respondents in Mailbird’s report, 60% said that unsubscribing from unnecessary, irrelevant, or unread newsletters or email marketing campaigns helped them to manage inbox size successfully, whereas 49% say email filters are the favorite practices for email management.  

Getting at the sources of most incoming emails — social media, marketing campaigns, subscriptions, spam, industry news, etc. — and eliminating those that are unnecessary is crucial to managing email size.  

Determining which are necessary can be a challenge for many workers, as 73% say there is no formal sense of which emails are work-crucial and which are not. Consulting with managers and coworkers may help resolve ambiguities on priorities.  

Once that has been accomplished, deleting the excess may be time-consuming, and companies could consider investing in email cleaning software that can streamline this entire process, thus making it all the less stressful for workers.  

Portions of this article originally appeared on the AllWork Space website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

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The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

How To Get Your Office More Organized

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To help you get organized, here are some simple but effective office products that can help you feel empowered to do your best work:

Labeled receptacles

Whether you work from home or in an office, you’ll inevitably accumulate trash. Rather than collect a growing pile of sticky notes, snack wrappers, disposable coffee cups, and paperwork you no longer need, set up a duo or trio of easy-to-access bins for trash and recycling. You’ll likely want separate bins for trash and recycling and may consider a shredder bin for more sensitive paper waste. If your bins aren’t already labeled (many recycling bins feature a recycling logo), you may want to choose different colored bins or add helpful labels. Once you set up your waste and recycling system, be mindful of when you need to empty each bin to prevent unsightly—and potentially pungent—overflow.

Message boards

Sure, most workers have smartphones with notetaking, reminder, and calendar apps already built in. But sometimes those vital reminders vanish into the ether as they flee from sight (and mind). Keep your most important messages—be they appointment reminders, workflow steps, positive affirmations, or anything in between—on display with a bulletin board or dry-erase board. You can even opt for a combination cork and whiteboard or choose a dry-erase board with a monthly calendar built right in. Update and clear your boards on a weekly or biweekly basis so they don’t turn into clutter zones.

Calendars and planners

If dry-erase calendars aren’t your cup of tea, a paper calendar can help you keep tabs on each workday while providing the benefits of handwriting your events and tasks. For instance, research shows handwriting activates larger networks of the brain than typing and may be a superior option for learning and information recall. If you’re not the desk calendar type, you can also choose a more compact day planner with the option to add page refills at the start of a new year.

Timer

A timer may not be the first item you think of regarding workplace organization. But when it comes to time management and meeting deadlines, timers can help you stay on task and take performance-boosting breaks at set intervals. Take, for instance, the Pomodoro technique. The idea is that by focusing on one task for a set period—and then completely taking the focus off that task during designated break periods—you’ll be much more productive and efficient. And while you could easily pull up a timer on your computer or phone, a handheld timer can help you concentrate even more by keeping digital distractions out of view.

Filing system

Depending on your line of work and how much paper you need to keep track of at any given time, you may be able to properly organize physical documents with a small, stackable desktop letter tray. Alternatively, you may need to invest in a filing cabinet to sort and secure important papers. Don’t forget to stock up on folders and labels to keep your files organized and easy to find. Once you settle on a filing system, consider which items you can scan (and then recycle the hard copies) and which ones you can shred.

Desk organizer

One of the most effective ways to clear productivity-hindering desktop clutter? Get yourself a desk organizer. If you have a desk drawer and a lot of supplies, you may opt for a drawer organizer for items you use once a week or once a month and a desktop organizer for daily-use items, including pens, pencils, scissors, hair ties, lip balm, reading glasses, your phone, and a phone charger. If you have multiple drawers in your desk, you may also be able to convert one into a charging station to free your desktop of unwieldy cords.

Conclusion

While these tools aren’t the be-all and end-all for office organization, investing in some tried-and-true decluttering supplies will be a helpful foundation to set you up for workplace success. One simple change—like hanging a whiteboard or sticking to a clearly labeled filing system—can help you get on track as you commit yourself to a more orderly workspace.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Quill website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

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The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

How Workplace Design Can Help Attract Gen Z

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The most recent generation to enter the workforce is Generation Z. Born between 1997 and 2012, Generation Z currently makes up 30 percent of the world’s population and is expected to make up 27% of the workforce by 2025.  What Gen Z desires from an employer:

Flexibility

In the era of hybrid and remote work modalities, Gen Z desires flexibility when it comes to working. They entered the workforce at a pivotal moment in history where full-time remote work was not only an option but necessary. The pandemic revealed the potential for people to have greater flexibility in terms of alternative work models and styles. Because Gen Z entered the workforce during or after the pandemic, they never had the opportunity to establish a steady routine of working 40 hours per week in an office, let alone having to commute to an office. As a result, Gen Z desires greater flexibility on when and where they work. As the first digitally native generation, Generation Z is incredibly technologically savvy and can quickly adapt to a remote or hybrid working method. Unlike earlier generations that struggled to adapt on how to collaborate online through virtual calls or present effectively, Generation Z can efficiently work from anywhere.

On the contrary, finishing a degree or starting a job isolated in your bedroom also affects how often you want human interaction. Research has shown that Gen Z wants to come into the office, even if it is just once or twice a month. Personal development and enrichment are crucial for most people starting their professions. And, without the benefit of spending time in a face-to-face workplace amongst peers, many Gen-Zs are concerned about falling behind. As a result, Gen Z is looking for employers who prioritize work-life balance, remote working, and flexible hours.

How to incorporate flexibility into office design

Having offices that are bookable or shared is a wonderful way to supply employees with choices on how they work. Having bookable or shared workspaces creates spaces for individuals who may want to come to the office and prioritize focus time with the ability to step out and collaborate with colleagues. Furthermore, traditional hierarchies in space planning are reduced because not everyone will have a designated desk and the best office real estate spaces can be used and booked by everyone. Moreover, Flexibility can refer to more than just being able to work from home. Offices can provide employees with flexibility in having different seating arrangements not only for downtime. We are all aware of the different seating arrangements to shake things up but what gets missed is how are these seating arrangements being used? Is there a need for a mobile whiteboard? Power requirements either in the furniture itself or nearby? There is a range of factors to consider when setting up a flexible workplace, but Gen Z will appreciate the ability to work remotely and in a variety of office environments.

Attention to Mental Wellbeing and Wellness

Generation Z is particularly concerned about mental health. Over 50% of 18-24-year-olds have reported at least one mental health issue, such as anxiety or depression, as per the research carried out by the Center for Disease Control. But unlike their predecessors, they are taking a stand and bringing awareness to their mental health. Burnout and stress associated with a lack of mental health care are not things that Generation Z has been taught to tolerate. Generation Z wants a healthy work-life balance and prioritizes their mental health and wellness. They are opposed to working excessive hours and overworking themselves to bolster a company’s financial performance. Therefore, companies must not only take part in raising awareness about wellness and mental health issues but also invest in initiatives and services that address the issue. There is no one-size-fits-all answer; instead, it requires a long-term commitment that focuses on uplifting employees and how they feel about their work.

How to improve mental health in the workplace

Companies and management should want to show their Gen Z employees that they are embracing mental health efforts. Implementing an inclusive “wellness room” is a wonderful way to start. A wellness room is a designated, secluded area in your office where employees can take time out to tend to their own personal health needs. It can take many forms and must be inclusive of all your employees’ needs. Some examples that companies have implemented in a wellness room include a prayer room, yoga room, nap pods, or simply a space to wind down and read a book. Think of it as a space that supports what you would like when you need a break.

Incorporating extra support and gathering areas in the office design is another technique to supply mental health support by encouraging socializing. Employees’ mental health can benefit from game rooms, cafeteria-style lunchrooms, or other locations where they can break their routines. Employers can boost productivity, reduce burnout, and foster a better work-life balance for employees by allowing them to take time away from work to focus on their wellness and mental health.

A Technologically Savvy Space

Generation Z grew up in the age of connecting digitally. As a mobile-first generation, Generation Z is tech-savvy in all aspects of their lives and sees technology as an extension of themselves. As a result, they will blend better with forward-thinking companies interested in implementing innovative technologies. Gen Z is not interested in working for a company that does not show the willingness to adopt change and is still trapped in the prehistoric era of solely using paper and pencils.

Technology in the office

Companies should improve their digital employee experience to satisfy Generation Z’s digital literacy and needs. Choosing a technology-friendly office design that incorporates communal tablets, interactive screens, and other tech advancements that make work smoother is a fantastic way to show that your company is trying to optimize the workplace. Furthermore, companies can utilize tools to help keep the office functioning better such as desk booking applications.

Combination of both private and collaborative workspaces

The pandemic has significantly affected how Generation Z wants to work. Working remotely in the comfort of their own home in solitude allowed them to appreciate private spaces where they can engage in periods of focused work. They have perfected the art of remote work, and they, like their Millennial counterparts, also value collaborative work. Growing up in a hyper-connected world eased through social media, Gen Z is sociable and finds pleasure in collaborating with others and coming together to solve problems.

Designing an office with a balance of private and collaborative workspaces

Striking the correct social-private balance in the workplace and other aspects of your office’s physical architecture is critical. For an appealing workplace design for Gen Z, companies can blend practical workspaces that support individuals’ ability to concentrate alone and open spaces that increase collaboration. Employees can come up with innovative ideas that they can subsequently present to the rest of the workforce by spending time alone and gathering their thoughts during that concentrated period. Combining privacy pods, quiet private desk spaces, and open floor plans can help employees find a happy medium. Employees will be more motivated to come into the office if they know they can work individually while also communicating readily with team members in an informal setting.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the All Work website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

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The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

The Best Ways to Disconnect on Your Vacation

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Vacations offer time to relax and recharge. They’re an opportunity to spend quality time with those you care about and enjoy exciting new experiences. Yet, all too often, work-related stress (not to mention actual tasks and obligations) can bleed into what’s supposed to be important time-off.

A survey from the American Psychological Association found that more than 1 in 5 Americans feel stressed during their time-off—and 28% end up working more than they initially planned. The result? Positive effects of vacation—improved motivation, energy, and productivity—tend to wear off after just a matter of days.

So, how do you truly disconnect from work on vacation and reap the full benefits of time away from the daily grind? It starts with careful planning before you leave all the way through your return to work. Use these tips to leave your work at the office and return to work after vacation feeling rejuvenated.

Getting Organized: Up to Your Last Day of Work Before Vacation

Making the most of your vacation requires getting organized ahead of time. To leave your work at the office, you need to leave things in a good place. Check off these things to do before going on vacation and you’ll set yourself up for a more relaxing trip.

Set the Stage: Starting 2 to 3 weeks before your trip, add a note to your email signature that outlines your upcoming vacation dates. If you are in regular, close contact with clients, communicate with them directly about your upcoming time-off.

Share a Coverage Plan: As your departure day approaches, communicate with colleagues, and develop a plan to ensure that urgent tasks and needs are delegated and covered as required. Discuss ongoing projects and chart any important milestones and expected progress for the period you’re gone.

Set Up an Out-of-Office Reply: Knowing how to write an out-of-office message for vacation is an important skill—and a task you won’t want to forget to check off. Use your OOO message to let your correspondents know when you will return, whether you will be checking messages and, especially if not, who they can contact in the meantime.

Tidy Up Your Space: The last thing you need upon your return is a messy desk or office. Whether you work from home or at the office, make sure you spend some time organizing your space before closing shop. Not only will it be easier to get back to work on your return, but you’ll also leave town with that extra bit of peace of mind.

How to Disconnect from Work—and Your Devices—While on Vacation

While prepping ahead of time is key, the real work of unplugging from your job comes once you arrive. Make a clean break from your work stress and your devices—or as much of one as you can—by following these simple steps.

Leave What You Can at Home: Between laptops, tablets, and smartphones, your colleagues and clients have a lot of ways to find you these days. The easiest way to disconnect is to leave whatever work-related devices you can at home.

Turn Off Notifications: If you don’t have a work-supplied smartphone, odds are you have various work-related apps on your personal device. Silence the barrage of daily messages and make it easier to resist any temptation to join in by turning off notifications for the duration of your travel.

Go Device-Free for a While: Even if you’re not using your personal devices for work, make sure you carve out some time to disconnect entirely. Schedule a hike, a day at the beach, or a guided urban tour—anything that allows you to unplug, relax, and truly take a break from the stressors of work and life outside vacation.

If You Must: The Right Way to Work While on Vacation

The reality of being an employee is, of course, that people depend on you. And in our always-on world that makes instant communications easier than ever, sometimes disconnecting entirely isn’t always in the cards. Still, that doesn’t have add up to a stressful or work-filled vacation. After all, if that’s the case, does it really count as a vacation? Keep work from overrunning your R&R with these best practices.

Define the Bare Minimum: Pose one simple question ahead of your trip is: “Just how little work can I do to stay on track?” This amount will, of course, vary from person to person and role to role. But being aware of your bare minimum can help you set a limit on the maximum amount of work you’re willing and able do while still focusing on traveling.

Create a Schedule (and Stick to It): Based on how much work you need to do, define a set schedule. Ideally, this will just entail a short session or two each day at the most. Communicate this schedule to your travel buddies and enlist their help in making sure you work only during this pre-determined time.

Find the Right Spot: At the end of the day, even if you need to get some work done, you’re still on vacation. So, make sure it feels like it. If possible, find a unique or scenic spot to work from, rather than just any old desk in your hotel or apartment. Your coworkers might be jealous when you take a conference call from your beach chair, but they certainly can’t fault you for it—you’re on vacation, after all.

Back to Reality: How to Return to Work After Vacation

Going back to work after vacation can be a real drag. So much so there’s even a term for this rough return. To some extent, these “post-vacation blues” are unavoidable. (Who wouldn’t want to remain seaside or slope-side instead of coming back into to the office?) However, it’s still possible to rein in the gloom and more easily adjust to normal life.

Build in a Buffer: When you get back from vacation, you’ve got much more than just work to worry about. Give yourself sometime to decompress, get your personal affairs back in order, and potentially get over jet lag by scheduling a day or two of buffer between your trip and your return to work.

Set Priorities: Before you start in on what might seem like an endless list of to-dos, make things easier on yourself by getting organized. Break down your tasks by their level of priority and break up larger projects into more manageable milestones to ease your return to work after vacation.

Craft the Right Calendar: If you’ve successfully disconnected while away, you can probably expect to find a full inbox waiting for you on your return. Between catching up on messages and getting a handle on high-priority tasks, the last thing you need is a cluttered calendar packed with meetings. When you get back to work, reschedule any inessential meetings for later in the week and let yourself focus on what you need to do most.

Look Forward to Your Next Getaway

Maybe the best way to cure the post-vacation blues? Give yourself another trip to look forward to. During your first days back to the grind, it’s easy to find yourself daydreaming of another trip. So, if you can, act on those desires and book yourself another trip for the near future.

Knowing you’ve got another opportunity to disconnect from work on the horizon might be all the motivation you need. And with some practice on using these tips on how to disconnect from work, you’ll already know how to make the most of your next getaway.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Quill website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.