How to Increase Your Productivity

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Creating a Calmer, More Productive Workspace

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Many of us spend a good chunk of each day sitting at our desks. The way your workspace is designed can have a huge impact on productivity, either helping you stay focused and motivated or providing distractions and interruptions. Applying the principles of feng shui to your office is one way to foster a calm, productive work environment and create positive energy that carries over into the rest of your life, too.

By addressing the energy, or chi, in your office, the ancient Chinese art encourages “better focus, more success, and improved overall workflow,” says Leslie Close, a Los Angeles-based interior designer and feng shui expert. Feng shui provides guidelines for a room’s layout, decor, color scheme, and other elements that can help promote a positive vibe. “The energy in your office, whether at home or at work, affects how you feel in the space,” Close says, “and how you feel affects your productivity and the quality of your work.” Use these tips to apply feng shui to your office for a happier, more balanced work life.

1. Clear away office clutter

A tidy, clutter-free workspace will help you focus on the task at hand rather than the mess around you. Clear out any unnecessary items from your workspace, such as old paperwork, excess office supplies, and other miscellaneous objects. This applies to unseen messes, too. “Don’t forget to clear the clutter in your drawers and on your computer,” Close says. “Just because it’s not on your desktop doesn’t mean it’s not important to shaping the energy of the room.”

2. Opt for a feng shui office layout

The key to a feng shui office layout is placing your desk in the command position. When sitting at your desk, you should be able to see the door without being directly in line with it. “You want to be able to see what is coming your way,” Close explains. The ideal desk placement is in the center of the room, which allows energy to flow all around you, but if that’s not feasible, at least ensure your back is not facing the door.

3. Incorporate nature into your office

“Nature reminds us to step back, breathe, and flow—to stay focused, without being stressed and intense,” Close says. Introduce the calming effects of nature into your office with plants or images of natural scenes. In particular, Close suggests decorating with mountain artwork. “Hang a picture of the mountains behind you because the mountain energy brings support and helps keep you grounded,” she says. A window with a view can also help keep you inspired throughout the day.

4. Avoid fire elements

Feng shui uses the elements of earth, metal, water, wood, and fire to achieve balance in a home. Each element brings a certain type of energy to a room and can be represented by various materials, colors, or objects. For an office, Close recommends steering clear of fire, as it “can burn the energy away and bring tension.” Avoid lighting candles in your workspace or decorating with red colors, which can introduce “turmoil and chaos” to your work life, she says.

5. Bring in water and metal elements

Water and metal, on the other hand, are much better suited for a feng shui office. Often considered a symbol of abundance, water can bring calm and flow to your workspace, while metal promotes sharpness and precision. Close recommends outfitting your desktop with a miniature fountain, a small metal sculpture, or other decorative objects that symbolize these elements. You can also evoke water and metal by decorating your office with shades of blue, gray, and white.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Yahoo Life website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

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The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Will a Purpose-Driven Culture Help Companies Retain Employees? 

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Increasingly, employees across the globe are prioritizing ‘purpose’ and ‘ownership’ in their working lives. As well as making a living, workers are looking for autonomy and they want to know that their work is having a positive impact on the world.

Small and mid-sized businesses (SMBs) are well placed to help workers find purpose and ownership in what they do. This is because SMBs are more versatile and flexible than large established corporations with entrenched practices and procedures. Agile businesses are able to pivot at speed. But when it comes to instilling a sense of purpose and ownership, systemic changes are often needed. 

But first, let’s get to grips with the terminology. 

What is ‘purpose’?

Purpose is a person’s enduring intention to fulfill a long-term aim that a) means something to them on a personal level, and b) has a positive impact on the world. 

Aims that contribute to an individual’s sense of purpose tend to be the ones that also impact other people’s lives, such as developing a cure for a disease, employing people in a business or teaching someone else a new skill. 

Our sense of purpose – what drives us – evolves over time. It’s important to bear in mind that purpose is a journey, not a destination. It’s what propels us and gives our personal and professional lives meaning.

Are we becoming more purpose-driven?

The pandemic has prompted many of us to reassess our values and think about whether we’re living up to them in what we do both inside and outside of the workplace. 

There’s an appetite for making choices that align with our values, and people are evaluating whether their employer’s values align with their own. 

Closer attention is being paid to which organizations treat their workers fairly and use sustainable practices to minimize environmental damage, and which don’t. 

On the whole, people’s career choices are being driven by a desire to make a positive change in the world. In the future of work, it’s safe to assume that there will be a rise in people who want to find meaning in their work by opting for purpose-led companies.

What is ‘ownership’?

Ownership is about being accountable for something and taking the initiative. In a work context, it’s about seeing a task or responsibility through to completion. 

Ownership doesn’t mean working in isolation, however. It relies on collaboration and delegation – and seeking help from others when necessary.  

We’re living in an age where the notion of ownership is changing. 

We used to associate the word ownership with the purchase of an asset such as a home or car. Now that ownership in this sense is becoming out of reach for a growing number of people, its meaning is becoming more abstract.  

Perhaps in the future of work, having responsibility and ‘ownership’ will become even more important in helping people feel like they have more control over their lives. 

Helping workers identify the importance and purpose of their work

The first step to enabling your workers to identify the importance of their work is to define your organization’s purpose. Your SMB’s purpose is the only thing you have direct control over. Attempting to summarize it in a sentence is a good place to start. 

People are becoming increasingly savvy when it comes to differentiating businesses who talk about purpose from those who actually practice what they preach. 

Is your organization living up to its values? 

Spend some time with your team to reflect on what your company’s values are and open up a dialogue on what impact it has on the world. On balance, is it net positive or negative?

McKinsey & Company survey found that employees are five times more likely to be excited to work at a company that spends time reflecting on the impact it makes in the world. 

It also found that workers who are given opportunities to reflect on their own sense of purpose and how it aligns with the company they work for are almost three times more likely to feel like their purpose is fulfilled at work. 

Conversely, people who aren’t given opportunities to reflect on their purpose had just a 7 percent chance of fulfilling it at work.

Do the managers within your SMB talk about purpose? Do they lead with empathy? Is there a culture of sharing and psychological safety?

According to Dr. Timothy Clark, author of The 4 Stages of Psychological Safety: Defining the Path to Inclusion and Innovation, employees must move through the following four stages of psychological safety before they feel comfortable to make valuable contributions:

Stage 1 – Inclusion Safety: Inclusion safety satisfies the basic human need to connect and belong. In this stage, you feel safe to be yourself and are accepted for who you are, including your unique attributes and defining characteristics.

Stage 2 – Learner Safety: Learner safety satisfies the need to learn and grow. In this stage, you feel safe to exchange in the learning process, by asking questions, giving and receiving feedback, experimenting, and making mistakes.

Stage 3 – Contributor Safety: Contributor safety satisfies the need to make a difference. You feel safe to use your skills and abilities to make a meaningful contribution.

Stage 4 – Challenger Safety: Challenger safety satisfies the need to make things better. You feel safe to speak up and challenge the status quo when you think there’s an opportunity to change or improve.

McKinsey & Company’s survey also explored the impact of psychological safety, and found the respondents who experienced little psychological safety in the workplace had a 0.5% chance of fulfilling their purpose at work. 

Of course, it’s also important to provide opportunities for workers to be able to fulfill their purpose at work. 

SMBs should begin by seeking out ways for employees to find meaning in their daily working lives; they should weave purpose into the fabric of their brand values and operations too. 

There are lots of ways to do this. Take John Lewis, for example:

John Lewis calls its employees “partners” because the company is actually the largest employee-owned business in the UK. This is a great example of how purpose can be fulfilled through ownership – in this case, by literally owning a portion of the business. 

The thinktank Ownership at Work published a report that found employee ownership, whether achieved through direct shareholdings or an employee-owned trust, is popular across all locations and industries. 

Some companies help their employees find purpose outside of work by offering opportunities to volunteer for a non-profit for a specified number of days per month, or by offering sabbaticals. 

Portions of this article originally appeared on the All Work website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Unusual Laws in the United States

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

GIS and Real Estate


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Rooted in the science of geography, or “the science of where,” GIS (Geographic Information Systems) are a framework for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and visualizing data. GIS combine geographical features with non-geographical tabular data and transform this information into visualizations that map and assess real-world problems. GIS allow users to see business data like sales and locations on a map juxtaposed against demographic information, hydrography, parcel data and more, and can be leveraged to identify patterns, monitor market changes, and find opportunities to optimize business operations. In the real estate world, a GIS is a tremendous tool for providing insightful data that can push the industry forward.

Several major players in the real estate industry leverage GIS to find greater insights and take their service offerings to the next level. ESRIMapboxLandVision, and open-source platforms like QGIS provide mapping and analytic solutions for professionals seeking geospatial insights, demonstrating the vital role of data in the industry. There are five key real estate practices that GIS have proven to be a game-changer for:

  • Site Selection: It’s no secret that real estate is all about location and GIS are essential for locating property in a fast and uncomplicated manner. Advisors and account teams can find and visualize up-to-date information on available market opportunities fitting the suitability of clients’ needs, searching by various criteria such as price points or vacancy.
  • Commute Impact & Labor Studies: An organization’s most important asset is its people. Understanding the labor strategy, growth projections, and how site selection and design will impact existing and future talent is critical to the success of any real estate transaction. GIS tools provide the ability to perform network and suitability analyses and develop in-depth site profiling of employee accessibility and the area’s utility to business operations.
  • Land Sale Data: GIS have been used by various governments to publish land parcel information and county assessor data for years now. This allows for easier searching based on specifics that are outside traditional search terms. For instance, LandVision aggregates this data into a tool for advisors to identify a given parcel of land’s property value, acreage, sale date, owner information, and more.
  • Visual Communication: Sometimes it’s most important to see something to really comprehend it. Through the use of maps that visualize data like costs related to travel and employee location, GIS improve communications for real estate advisors, their clients, internal stakeholders and team members. Insights that may have been hidden deep in spreadsheets can become clear when presented visually, and mapping is an impactful way to show critical data and takeaways.
  • Information Accessibility: Mobile-enabled web map applications and virtual tours allow for quick surveys of areas when clients are unable to see a location in-person. This has been a significant tool during the pandemic, as people were less able to travel to a location at a moment’s notice. GIS also allow for the layering of data, such as demographic information and crime statistics, providing all the information needed for decision-makers and in a format that allows for a clear comparison.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the CRESA website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

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About The Sundance Company
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Why Company Culture Matters

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What is company culture?  

Organizational culture is formed on the basis of shared values and beliefs. Members of an organization derive those values from mutual assumptions regarding human nature, emotions, effectiveness, and their organization’s connection to its environment. Every company’s culture lives, breathes and evolves. A healthy culture is essential to a company’s success. Simply put, culture is what a company stands for, which guides how its employees behave.  

The Society of Human Resources Management (SHRM) revealed in a recent survey that company culture was the number one reason candidates picked one job over another.  

Undeniably, culture is important when finding a job, but you may be wondering how to determine aspects of a company’s culture without working there. More importantly, how you’ll know if a company’s culture will fit your personality and needs. The good news is, you can learn about a company’s culture by investing a small amount of time in conducting your own research. Here are some tips to help you uncover the information you need to determine the “right cultural fit” for your next job. 

How to find a company with a good culture 

Don’t wait until you’ve been offered a job to look into its culture. Your investigation should begin while you’re job hunting. Make a point to learn about the workplace culture of every company you are seriously considering working for. It’s important to know if your own values and beliefs will align with the cultures of companies that interest you.  

Your first step is easy. Most organizations feature some combination of their mission, vision and values on their website. You should find that page and read it thoroughly. Ask yourself, Do these beliefs and values align with my own? Do I believe in the company’s mission and purpose?  

Then, you’ll want to spend some time on company review websites, such as Glassdoor. For free, Glassdoor will provide you with insights into a company through employee reviews. They boldly showcase the good, the bad and the ugly. There’s nothing hidden behind closed doors (hence the name). It’s important to know how current and past employees view the organization and its culture.  

To really understand a company’s culture, be sure to check the news and other social media channels for organizational updates and key events.  

Ultimately, it’s important to remember that not all cultures are going to work for you. Some will align with who you are and what’s important to you, and others will not. Your sole task is to find those cultures that fit you best. 

How to ask about company culture in an interview 

Great news! There are ways to learn even more about a company’s culture during the interview process.  

Do you know anyone who works at that company? Are you getting to know people during the recruitment process?  These casual conversations happen, perhaps in an elevator or lobby. Or perhaps, given our newly accelerated virtual working environment, it could be a conversation with the recruiter or the receptionist booking your appointment. If you have the chance, simply ask, “What do you like about working here?” and “How would you describe the company culture”? Ask multiple people during the process; the more perspectives, the better.  

Next, be sure to ask culturally related questions in your interviews. Take the time to ask questions that highlight specific elements of the culture in your interviewers’ eyes, such as “What does success look like here” or “what are some of the traits that you look for in a successful candidate?” 

Then consider the information and answers that have been shared with you. Do the answers align with the culture you’re looking for? For example, if everyone you met said it’s a very fast-paced, dynamic environment, is that the pace you’re seeking? It’s important to connect the dots between what you’re hearing and your own wants and needs in an organization. 

1. Measure and reduce
Do more with less. “Measure your energy usage, look for patterns and make sure you’re using your equipment, lighting, and anything else that’s plugged in and whirring only when you need to,” says Bruce Macfarlane, non-executive director of Energy Action.

2. Be smart about when you contract
Buy your energy during quiet contracting times. Retailers are busy during peak contracting times – financial year end and late calendar year – so they might not give you the best price.

3. Don’t leave contracting until the last minute
Last-minute pricing is never cheap. The same applies to your energy contract. Get your contracts under control early and arrange your buying well before your existing contracts end.

4. Upgrade your equipment
It can be a false economy to keep going with the same old equipment that can suck up so much more energy than the newer versions, says Holly Taylor of the Energy Efficiency Council. Change old lights to LEDs or upgrade manufacturing plant so machinery works more efficiently. “Doing this can cut costs by up to 50 per cent,” she says.

LED bulbs last much longer and use a fraction of the power of older models. Photo: iStock

5. Push as many changes as you can through the board or management
You might start with a few solar panels on the roof, but when you can demonstrate savings, it’s likely that everyone will be much happier about taking more dramatic action.

6. Look for opportunities to recycle
BlueScope produced gas through one of their processes, so came up with a project to recondition a steam alternator to soak up some of the gas that could be used as a waste process gas and generate electricity. Speak to workers on the coalface, advises BlueScope’s Bridgette Carter, as they may have very good ideas.

7. Ask for advice from your peers
Don’t be afraid to reach out to others in your industry to see what they’ve done and how it’s helped them, recommends Taylor. “Businesses are generally happy to talk about climate leadership.”

8. Get auction competition
Energy Action, for example, runs Australia’s biggest business energy-buying service. Using their reverse auction, which makes it easy for retailers to price the demand, customers, on average, pay 20 per cent less for their energy than the first bid offered, says Bruce Macfarlane.

9. Understand your model
Often, people compare the deals from different providers but don’t realise they can be comparing apples with oranges, says Tim Ellis. “Some may be charging upfront costs, or billing ongoing energy use. So, understand how the companies are getting paid.”

10. Take a good, hard look at your bill
Energy retailers have had 25 years to make your bill easy to pay but hard to understand. The total amount due is on the front page in a really big font. “Charges are hidden in the back pages using industry codes, which are often confusing,” says Macfarlane. “Energy Action can check every element of your energy bill, so you don’t have to, and will contact a retailer if there’s any over-charging to have the excess refunded.”

Installing solar panels can reduce electricity bills. Photo: Supplied

11. Check your network tariff
This makes up 50 per cent of the most bills. “But you’ll often have to know the da Vinci Code to understand all the charges,” says Tim Ellis.

12. Get a handle on your data
It’s only if you gather data that you’ll know where you can save energy, and money. Carter says BlueScope invested in tools to log energy use in all their processes, and imposed targets on every part of the system.

13. Invest in renewables
You might not be able to generate all your power with renewables, but it will certainly help. “We looked at the opportunities in the renewable space,” says Carter. “We wanted to do something meaningful and help with costs.”

14. Find out about government incentives
Various levels of government offer a number of tax incentives or subsidies for companies upgrading their business equipment to reduce energy use or cut emissions.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Collier’s website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

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About The Sundance Company
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Effective Collaboration Strategies for Distributed Teams

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We need to stop assuming that old ways of work will come back and start anticipating working with distributed teams most—if not all—of the time. This will require that companies transition to an agile-first mindset that allows them to change habits on how teams work.

During Group Futurista’s “The Future of the Digital Workplace Webinar 2.0”, Jarom Chung, Product Director at Lucid, gave a keynote presentation on how to drive collaboration across distributed teams.

Chung argued that we need to make a bigger effort for teams to be in sync; otherwise, distributed collaboration will continue to fail. This effort requires that company leaders and employees alike rethink their approach to meetings and collaboration.

In Chung’s words: “The pandemic has resulted, for most of us, in too many meetings, with too many people, that take too much time.”

Meeting times may have increased, but collaboration has decreased since people started working remotely. To make matters worse, Chung argues that there is a deep loss of connection with lack of understanding of the full picture, which increases distance both physically and emotionally.

The goal of Chung’s discussion was to change the current mindset from surviving remote work, to thriving in remote work.

But wait, aren’t companies ready to welcome back workers into the office?

While companies have announced plans to welcome back employees in the office as soon as July, the reality is that companies are changing and adapting how they work.

Again, “we need to stop assuming that old ways of work will come back”.

It’s true that workers will return to the office, but they won’t do so full time. And many companies have already announced a remote-first approach to work moving forward.

What does this mean?

It means that distributed teams are here to stay, even if some workers do go back to the office.

Back to changing our mindset from surviving to thriving remote work…

For teams to succeed in remote work environments, companies need to transform their mindset from endless meetings to deeper team collaboration and connection. This means shifting from e-mail to Slack or Teams, and saying good-bye to Whiteboards and PowerPoint presentations and embracing visual collaboration tools that get the nuances that allow for the connection of ideas in a virtual environment.

Easier said than done, right?

“Distributed teams demand collaboration solutions that work anywhere, any time. Just as in the office I’m able to turn around and talk to someone behind me, I need to be able to know where my distributed colleagues are and how to find them.” – Jarom Chung, Lucid

3 Types of Team Collaboration to Transform Endless Meetings into Deeper Team Collaboration

  • Ad hoc collaborative sessions.
  • Facilitated, prepared collaboration with your team.
  • Building a distributed war room.

Let’s take a deeper look at each of these.

Ad hoc collaborative sessions

These are one-off meetings around a specific topic or discussion. Pre-remote, this type of meeting usually happened in a conference room, had a whiteboard, and were often initiated through casual conversations.

This type of meeting has failed in remote environments because:

  • It is difficult to collaborate simultaneously; remote collaboration requires is a higher activation energy.
  • Different levels of engagement and participation; people participating remotely aren’t necessarily willing to jump in during remote collaboration meetings.
  • Most people participating in remote meetings are multi-tasking, which creates silos.
  • Silos are created by multi-tasking because people aren’t bringing their whole attention and expertise to collaboration sessions.
  • Hard to efficiently synthesize ideas, Chung argues that this happened even pre-pandemic and in remote environments it’s even harder to get all ideas together, make sense of them, and plan action.
  • Lack of clear next steps.

To avoid the above pitfalls and increase the chances of your distributed team collaborating efficiently, Chung proposes the following:

  • Transform unengaging calls into team visual collaboration by embracing the right tools and platforms.
  • Have a shared location for knowledge (I.e., the cloud)—this is key for synchronous and asynchronous collaboration.
  • Have a shared communication channel.
  • Invite participants to engage—this means calling people out by name and asking them for their input.
  • Always end the meeting with clear action items and next steps.

Facilitated, prepared collaborative meetings

This type of meeting is designed to draw out people’s ideas and input. Think of brainstorming sessions or sprint planning meetings. This type of meeting typically has one person leading and driving the discussion.

Common pitfalls of this approach include:

  • Unprepared teams and facilitators.
  • Poor time management.
  • Unengaged participants.
  • Difficulty synthesizing ideas.
  • Difficulty deciding how to take action.
  • To avoid these pitfalls with distributed teams, Chung suggests the following:
  • Assign pre-work and set the stage.
  • Create an agenda and share it with participants beforehand.
  • Start off with ice breakers, especially if there are people that don’t know each other present.
  • Make sure every voice is heard—again call people by their name and ask for their input or feedback.
  • Time bucket activities—otherwise meetings will go on forever.
  • Determine next steps.

Building a virtual war room

Virtual war rooms, pre-remote, where basically a centralized meeting space where key people met together to solve a difficult problem. Often, this type of collaboration meetings required iterations and multiple sessions.

Some virtual war room examples include:

  • Strategic planning
  • Pre-mortem exercises
  • Release planning
  • Big room planning
  • Competitive analysis.

With remote work, virtual war rooms face one particular challenge: there is no centralized workspace, which means teams don’t have a physical spot for their war rooms.

For war rooms to be effective in a virtual environment, you will need to:

  • Find technology that supports effective team collaboration.
  • Use technology to augment what you would do in real life.
  • Make sure you are prepared.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the All Work Space website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.