Don’t Write Another Email Until You Read This

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Emails. Gotta write them. Gotta send them. But the person who gets them doesn’t have to do a single thing. They can ignore, delete, or just let them linger in inbox purgatory.

Which isn’t that encouraging, because after you spend all that time writing just the right message to a prospect, the last place you want it to go is in the trash.

So how do you write emails that get read—and even better, get a response? Today we’re sharing our top tips for writing must-read emails.

  1. Make your subject line a slippery slope

Think of your subject line as a “slippery slope”—a phrase that makes your prospect want to click and read more. If you can’t pique their interest with this short sentence, then forget about the email itself. It’s not going to get read.

Here are three tips for a great subject line:

Put the important words up front. If people are reading your email on a smartphone, the subject line will get cut off at some point. Space is precious here—don’t waste it. Your subject line should be 6-10 words long.

Keep it simple and clear. What will the person get from reading this email? Say it up front. Don’t write something vague like, “Do you have a moment?” or “Good time to talk?”

Use the person’s first name. Research suggests that people are more likely to click on emails that use their first name in the subject line.

  1. Don’t do what everybody else does

Everybody else fills their emails with reasons prospects should work with them. And all of their emails sound the same: I’ve done this, I’ve done that, I’ve been in this industry for 20 years, I’d like to talk.

Don’t do this. Instead, make your email about your prospect and their challenges or opportunities. For a refresher on how to do this, check out our related post on how to turn “me”-centered language into “you”-centered phrases people are more likely to respond to.

  1. Only ask for one thing

Ever get an email and think, “Huh? What does this person want me to do?” That’s probably because the sender was so eager to tell you about everything that they forgot one very important thing: never ask for more than one thing in an email!

Decide what you want your email to do. Do you want people to check out a listing? To look out for your phone call? To set up a meeting? Then, ask clearly for just that one thing. It makes it simple for people to respond with, “Yeah, sure, let’s do this!” instead of wondering how to respond at all, and then letting your email languish in their inbox unanswered.

  1. Put a timeframe on it.

Whatever your ask is, put a timeframe around it. For example, “Let’s connect this week—I can give you a call on Friday.” Or, “Send me a quick ‘yes’ now if you’re interested, and we can figure out the details this week.”

People appreciate when you let them know how much time they have to take you up on an offer, get a special perk, or simply respond to say they’re interested. It transforms your email from an ambiguous ask to a concrete action item, making it more likely that people will respond.

  1. Give the freedom of choice

Now that you’ve made it clear what you want your prospect to do, give them the freedom to do it. Collectively, studies done on over 22,000 people show that they’re way more likely to take you up on your offer if you tell them, “But you are free to [insert action here].”

So, tell them: “You are free to choose” or “I’d love to meet, but the choice is totally up to you” or “I think this would be extremely useful, but of course you are free to decide what’s best for you.” The exact wording doesn’t matter; it’s the spirit that those words convey that matters most. Even saying something like “don’t feel obliged” will work.

  1. Slash it in half

To quote the late great American novelist Elmore Leonard, “I leave out the parts that people skip.”

Once you’ve written your email, go back over it and start hitting “delete.” Omit every word that isn’t pulling its weight by either specifically helping your prospect or persuading them to do the thing you’re asking (see tip #3). Cut out the fluff, the clichés, and the filler. You’ve got 30 seconds to inspire action. Don’t waste them.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Apto website.

The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

 

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About The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

How Tech Tools Help CRE Professionals Accomplish More

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Five years ago, “prop tech” was a misunderstood buzzword that no one seemed to know how to define. These days, it is a common phrase in almost every commercial real estate (CRE) professional’s lexicon. But what’s more, prop tech is now regarded as an essential tool that is revolutionizing the way industry professionals conduct business and grow relationships with their clients.

Prop tech — shorthand for property technology — is real estate-focused technology that helps us apply data to the way we research, manage, buy and sell properties. While we have been using technology in the real estate world for decades, this new wave of property-specific innovation has been the real catalyst. From new AI-powered 3-D property tours to nationwide commercial real estate property search databases and cloud-based property management software to technology-backed investment platforms, prop tech tools are becoming integrated into all facets of our business.

Having spent more than 40 years in the industry, including providing some of the aforementioned services, I’ve witnessed this prop tech revolution firsthand. While some might say that technology could possibly make the role of real estate broker obsolete, I believe these innovations can help CRE professionals, as well as their clients, accomplish more than ever.

In order to fully reap the rewards that prop tech offers, we must understand its influence, but also learn how to strategically integrate it into the work we do. For the commercial real estate sector specifically, technology offers the ability to optimize a transaction at almost any phase, including how CRE professionals market properties, work with clients and develop business strategies.

Bolstering Relationships, Strategy And Marketing

For many years, CRE professionals have been the only resource. Now, new technology enhances the work they do. The rise of prop tech means consumers have more data available to them than ever, which impacts how clients and real estate professionals work together. These clients often come to the table as savvy buyers or sellers, equipped with a more solid understanding of the local market as well as what they want in their next space. Some might say knowledgeable clients could challenge a professional’s authority, but in truth, knowledge is power. A clear, shared vision enhances communication and collaboration, removes the guesswork and puts a property transaction that much further ahead.

The surge of readily available data also creates savvier CRE professionals. Data can inform, inspire and drive business strategies in new ways. For example, a broker can identify the sort of properties that are trending in their local market, or pinpoint how a particular property is resonating with potential buyers. This insight can help draw the line from a potential lead to a successful real estate transaction. New technologies can also help professionals operate more efficiently by reducing workload or automating processes.

With the rapidly expanding selection of prop tech platforms available, CRE professionals have more tools than ever to market new properties and connect with potential buyers. And as the user base for these search tools increases, so does the number of clients’ eyes a CRE professional can reach.

Using Prop tech To Stay Ahead In The Market

Looking at the many areas of the real estate business, it is easy to see the positive influence that prop tech has delivered. While the tools exist, there are many different approaches to utilizing them. Today’s real estate professionals have to find ways to apply these technological innovations to their own business models.

In my experience, this can be one of the most daunting challenges when it comes to incorporating technology. First ask, “What problems do we want to solve?” And then ask, “What are the right tools to get us there?”

Using tech to automate a demanding business process could allow more time for a broker to spend in face-to-face meetings with clients. Optimized functions of the tools used every day, now powered by technology, can help buyers and investors find the right property faster, expediting the transaction process for both the broker and the client. With the right fit, prop tech can help everyone stay ahead in the commercial real estate market.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Forbes website.

About The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

 

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About The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

 

Big Tech Reveals Smart Building Strategies

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When designing a smart building, the user experience is paramount. That’s the philosophy of Zorba Manolopoulos, global program manager in charge of Smart Campuses at Facebook, whose group is tasked with innovating and problem-solving for the social media giant’s worldwide property portfolio of about 80 buildings.

“Our (strategy) starts with the employee experience or occupant experience for that matter—what they want to do, what they want to feel, all the experiences that they want to have—that’s where we start. Then we shape the services to meet those goals,” Manolopoulos commented at this year’s Realcomm event in Nashville.

“We’re not really looking at smart buildings as a way to run a building better or more efficiently,” he said, adding that his group aims to provide sustainability if that’s what users demand.

Speaking in a panel discussion during the annual commercial real estate technology conference, Manolopoulos explained how his team considers a day in the life of a typical building user as Facebook scrambles to accommodate its rapidly growing staff—in the past year and a half, the company has doubled in size.

Take eating lunch, for example. “The first step in eating lunch is, you actually plan to eat lunch.” That gives rise to thorny questions about food options, dining companions, and the logistics of getting there and back. Inevitably, part of the solution involves an app.

“You started with the experience first and then let the tech provide the experience,” noted Manolopoulos.

Earlier this year, Facebook preleased an entire 803,000-square-foot office campus for its virtual reality arm Oculus in the San Francisco suburb of Burlingame, Calif.

Issues of Energy and Cost

Kathy Farrington brings a slightly different focus to her work as technical program manager at Google, which has hundreds of buildings in its portfolio. “User experience is definitely key, but obviously we really care about sustainability as well, and driving down not necessarily costs as much as energy use and the impact on the environment,” which includes green materials and other factors beyond energy use, she said.

“Space utilization is also really important,” she added. Farrington emphasized that companies need to prioritize. “If you don’t have a functional BMS (building management system) or a functional lighting control system, you’ve got to solve that first.”

For Jared Summers, who serves as data foundation manager at ExxonMobil, applying digital technologies to the firm’s global portfolio of thousands of properties involves a more cost-conscious approach.

“The experience is important, and we design for that,” Summers noted in the panel. “However, the story goes around the operational efficiency and the savings, because then that gets it past management. We are in a fundamentally different industry than tech.”

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Commercial Property Executive website.

The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

 

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About The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

After Retail, These are The Biggest Drivers to Shopping Centers

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The food and beverage category and entertainment are taking up more and more of shoppers’ time — and money.

Since January, 81% of shopping center visitors have spent money on food and beverage services at a shopping center and 80% have purchased from traditional retailers, according to the International Council of Shopping Center’s Mixed Use survey. About two-fifths (38%) of U.S. adults now spend more on eating/drinking at dining establishments (including takeout). And 50% of all consumers want to see more dining options in centers; 40% want to see more leisure and entertainment options.

After all their eating and drinking, consumers are trying to remain healthy and are going to gym/fitness centers, yoga and cycling studios and visiting medical clinics in shopping centers. Just over one-third (36%) of consumers say they visit health/wellness facilities, such as gyms, yoga/cycling studios more now than two years ago, with the figure even higher for millennials (47%). And about one-quarter of consumers also say they would like more medical/health clinics (28%), personal care services (26%) and gyms/fitness centers (25%)

The survey also revealed that 79% of respondents have visited brick-and-mortar retailers the same amount or more over the past two years. But there are generational differences when it comes to what consumers have spent on at shopping centers since the start of 2019. Nearly nine of 10 (86%) baby boomers bought retail goods compared to 76% of Generation X and 75% of millennials.

In other key findings:

  • More than two-fifths (44%) of consumers say that their shopping center visits today are more likely to include a variety of different activities compared to two years ago and close to half (45%) of U.S. adults would travel farther to a shopping center that offers a wider variety of tenants than one that is closer with less.
  • Among non-retail tenants, 62% of consumers are driven to a shopping center by the leisure and entertainment venues. Nearly as many (56%) are enticed by the fast food/coffee shops, while 53% are drawn by the full-service, casual/fine dining restaurants and 51% by the limited-service, fast-casual dining establishments. To a lesser extent, but still influential are fitness & wellness facilities (47%), personal care services (46%) and professional services (42%). In addition to motivating shopping center
  • The majority (78%) of adults say they would reside in a ‘live, work, shop, play’ community. The top reasons are convenience/efficiency (55%) and easier access to amenities as a result of aging (46%).

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Chain Stor Age website.

About The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.