Which Batteries Last The Longest?

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Creating More Efficient Workplaces

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Maintaining focus is a skill and concentrating for long periods of time is not easy. In fact, research shows employees often feel this – 70% admit feeling distracted at work, and only 57% agree that their workplace enables them to work productively.

What does this mean for business? A research study on productivity found that U.S. workers were losing 2.1 hours every day due to distraction, which translates to 28 billion hours and $588 billion lost annually. The study also revealed that noisy workplaces and mobile phones are to blame for most of the distractions. Additional external distractions might include the smell of someone’s lunch, or the conversation colleagues are having a few desks over, while internal sources could range from not getting enough sleep to over-analyzing an earlier exchange.

Although workplace distractions can come in many forms, science shows there are steps architects and designers can take to create a work environment optimized for each employee to stay focused and feel comfortable. They can do this by considering the full spectrum of human senses – sight, hearing, feel, smell, taste, balance and body awareness.

The Power of a Human-Centered Design

Best-in-class organizations will need to balance the needs of the individual employee with the overall business objectives for a built space. Although it may seem obvious as we sit here in 2022, it’s important to look back at workplaces from the past to determine what we can learn from these eras of office planning.

A human-centered approach – being empathetic to people’s sensory uniqueness – reflects the philosophy that effective design should be informed by the occupants of a space. For example, the acoustic, textural and visual qualities of materials, furniture and lighting selections in support of specific typologies, influence how people experience a space. While highly textured and colorful spaces can help spur creativity, the use of soft surfaces and natural colors can contribute to a sense of calm. Specific behavior can be directed and supported by the appropriate combinations of design elements.

Integrating Sensory Design Elements into the Workplace

Designing for the individual means creating a range of sensory environments to address distraction issues and a lack of control on our surroundings in the office – this ultimately supports the cognitive wellbeing of employees. To do this, architects and designers must consider two main factors that influence an individual’s response to sensory stimulation – personality type and sensory profile.

Many modern psychologists work off the idea that there are five basic dimensions of personality, known as the “Big Five Personality Traits” or OCEAN model. These five personality types are: openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness and neuroticism. Each personality type includes different traits and thresholds that shape how someone identifies with and responds to both their environment and colleagues.

Everyone has a unique and innate neuropsychological response to processing sensory information. The individual’s sensory profile influences their productivity and performance based on their current environment.

With such a diverse workforce, it is critical that work environments offer a variety of different spaces that cater to differing sensitivities and distraction levels (e.g. to different personality types and sensory profiles). Each employee can then transition through the different workspaces based on their preferences and changing sensory needs as the day progresses.  For example, people with different sensory thresholds may want to work in surroundings that include spatial considerations like acoustic privacy, adjustable lighting or temperature control. It is important to note that choice alone is not enough – there must be cultural permission to work on an exterior roof deck or sit in a wing back chair with your feet up.

The Role of Biophilic Design

As humans, we have an inherent attraction to nature and natural processes. However, more than 50% of the world’s population live in urban areas, where people often spend about 85% of their time inside. Through biophilic design, we can enhance occupant experience, health and wellbeing in the built environment by improving connections to nature.

Architects and designers can consider all senses when designing a workspace by employing biophilic design principles to bring nature into the built environment to help support general cognitive wellbeing. When applying this design approach to various “sub-spaces” within one office, it’s easier to create a working environment that supports the neurodiversity of different employees by providing areas that can accommodate all.

Within biophilic design, there is a scale of sensory stimuli to consider, from high to low. High sensory environments are more social, open and collaborative, with lots of sensory input and diverse activity, reminiscent of a rainforest. These spaces might include built-in ambient noise, kinetic sculptures, glass partitions, varying plants or more complex visuals, art and patterns.

In contrast, a low sensory environment is devoid of most stimuli, and often features low lighting, soft furnishings and as little noise as possible – almost reminiscent of a cave. A space like this would be partitioned and feature clean lines, reduced clutter, strong soundproofing and soft lighting.

By providing a variety of spaces across this sensory scale, employees gain more control of their surroundings and can help remove the need for practices such as a designated “quiet hour.” With textiles like flooring and upholstery, work environments can be equipped to support differing stimuli needs – for example, a very textural carpet tile style might be used in an open environment to provide high sensory cues.

Offering a range of spaces allows each employee to consider their own personal preferences and apply them to how they approach the task at hand, so they can deliver their best work.

Getting Back to Roots

In recent years, mindfulness and cognitive wellbeing have been top-of-mind for many members of the A&D community, especially when it comes to workplace projects. By taking inspiration from nature, biophilic design allows architects and designers to get back to the roots of human sensory behavior and puts the sensory control back into the hands of the employee, helping them establish a healthier working connection with the workplace.

Research shows this approach can lead employees to experience increased productivity and less anxiety, stress and burnout, while helping them feel more creative and innovative. Providing a choice of sensory spaces within the workplace is an opportunity for architects, designers and company leadership to help employees re-establish a healthy working relationship with the office during this time of transition. The future of workplace has never been more uncertain or more exciting.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the All Work Space website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

The Top Ten Exercise Myths

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Workplace Wellness to Reduce Physical Stress

No matter how much you might love what you do, there’s no escaping the fact that work can be stressful. Whether you’re juggling tasks, meeting deadlines, or working long hours, it’s no secret that work can take its toll.

Use these workplace wellness tips for employees to take care of your body at work and reduce physical stress.

Start with the Right Setup: Crafting an Ergonomic Workstation

Taking care of your body at work starts with having the right ergonomic desk setup. Because office work so often involves repetitive tasks and postures, even slight changes to the way your workstation is configured can make a huge difference in how much stress you place on your body throughout the day.

Follow these healthy workplace tips to make your space more ergonomic and create a physical environment that supports your body at work:

  • For desk workers who spend most of the day sitting, an ergonomic office chair, such as this Tempur-Pedic® task chair, is essential. Choose a chair that supports spinal alignment and sound posture. In addition, set your chair at the right height, ensuring that your feet can lay flat on the floor.
  • Your chair isn’t the only factor in supporting good posture. Avoid slouching and craning your neck by placing your computer monitor atop a stand, stack of books, or small box to keep it at eye level. A good rule of thumb for monitor positioning is to align the top of the screen with your eye line.
  • Support your arms and wrists to avoid straining your back and shoulders. Adjust your chair’s armrests so that your arms are slightly lifted at your shoulders. A wrist rest can bring additional comfort and ergonomics to your workstation setup.
  • At the end of the day, just sitting for too long—even at the most ergonomic desk—can take its physical toll. Consider counteracting the effects of so-called “sitting disease” by opting for an adjustable workstation. A sit-stand ergonomic solution that allows you to adjust the height of your desk, as needed, between sitting and standing, can reduce discomfort and help you maintain productivity.

Build in Breaks
Even when supported by the best workstation design, the body is simply not meant to withstand very long sessions of stationary desk work, whether it’s done sitting or standing. That’s why it’s critical to take short breaks throughout the day to stretch, hydrate, improve circulation, and help keep stress and strain from building.

Of course, during a busy or productive period, it can be easy to let too much time pass between pauses in your work. Luckily, technology can help remind you to take care of your body as well as your work tasks. Setting recurring notifications in your calendar or on your smartphone’s clock app can provide timely reminders. You can even use fitness trackers to set reminders, too. Similarly, following the Pomodoro technique can incorporate short breaks in a productive rhythm of work while encouraging longer breaks over time.

Rest Your Eyes, Too

Be sure to care for your eyes as well as you do the rest of your body during these breaks. After all, prolonged use of your computer can lead to a range of aggravating eye health complications. Avoid eye strain, dry eyes, and even potential migraines by adhering to the 20-20-20 rule. It’s just about as easy to follow as it is to remember: Simply pause every 20 minutes to look into the distance 20 feet for 20 seconds. In the meantime, take even more strain off your eyes by outfitting your workspace with eye-friendly office lamps and lighting.

Take Your Meetings on the Move

For many office employees, a schedule full of meetings might make it even harder to find the time to get out of the chair—whether it’s at your own desk or in the conference room just down the hall.

However, a slate of meetings doesn’t necessarily need to be incompatible with movement. For instance, you can easily convert your one-on-ones and team check-ins from stale sit-downs to dynamic walking meetings. Even if you don’t head very far, just getting outside for some fresh air can reduce stress and give you yet another opportunity to stretch, away from your desk.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Quill website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Commercial Real Estate Success With The Sundance Company

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The Sundance Company’s success comes from the fact that we truly care about your success as well. We pride ourselves on the quality of our portfolio, the depth of our management team, and, most of all, our dedication to our customers. We also have the top commercial real estate professionals in the Boise metropolitan area employed at The Sundance Company. No matter the level of adversity, they evaluate their environment and industry conditions, then, they figure out a way to get space leased and effectively meet your business needs.

Sometimes expectations between tenants and property owners are so different, that there is no solution. However, generally, there is little complexity in leasing commercial space, as long as the parties negotiating fully understand the deal and recognize their mutual goals have been reached. The truly remarkable thing is how the professionals at The Sundance Company have helped meet the needs of the parties and effectively communicated the financial engineering behind it is designed to meet the needs of each party.

About The Sundance Company
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs in Boise, Meridian, Nampa, and the greater Treasure Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction, or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime Boise and Meridian locations. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Here’s How to Build and Retain a Strong Team

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What does it take to build and retain a strong team? If one were to survey managers on this very question, it would likely yield a wide variety of different – often incompatible – answers.  

In most cases, unfortunately, their answers are surely wrong. This is readily inferred from research on employee perception towards managers – particularly their perception regarding how their managers make them feel and how their managers treat them.  

According to research conducted by the Pew Research Center, the majority of people who quit their jobs in 2021 cited feeling disrespected at work as a fundamental reason for their decision to quit.  

“Majorities of workers who quit a job in 2021 say low pay (63%), no opportunities for advancement (63%), and feeling disrespected at work (57%) were reasons why they quit,” according to the Feb. survey.

Clearly, this isn’t contributing to retaining workers, let alone building a strong team. If business owners and managers are to succeed in building and retaining a strong team, multiple changes in the basic assumption of how to run a business need to be made. 

Ensure that your workers feel respected 

Apart from the obvious – i.e., not having your employees leave in droves – there are many good reasons to make your workers feel respected.  

According to the Harvard Business Review:  

“Those that get respect from their leaders reported 56% better health and well-being, 1.72 times more trust and safety, 89% greater enjoyment and satisfaction with their jobs, 92% greater focus and prioritization, and 1.26 times more meaning and significance. Those that feel respected by their leaders were also 1.1 times more likely to stay with their organizations than those that didn’t.”

In other words, there is a strong correlation between treating employees with respect, and improvements on markers that make for good workers. When managers and employers treat their workers with respect, workers become more enthusiastic and engaged with their work.  

“Respect,” however, comes in multiple forms, but can be arrived at through a simple strategy.  

Treat people how they want to be treated  

In Christianity and Confucianism, the famous Golden Rule instructs us to treat others the way we want ourselves to be treated. In Daoism, this rule is inversed: Daoists instruct us to treat others how they want to be treated.  

The Daoist view on this matter is favorable for workplace conditions and can be practiced very easily.  

One way to find out your worker’s needs is by asking them about them. There is ample opportunity for doing this in a subtle, non-judgmental, and warming way.  

For example, this can be done during the onboarding process. In fact, this may be the best time to question your workers about their needs. It not only makes a good first impression that you care, but it may help ease the onboarding process for the worker.  

Another crucial opportunity to understand your worker’s needs is when they tell you what their needs are unsolicited.   

If your worker needs to work remotely, and they tell you this out of the blue, this should be the beginning of a good-faith negotiation – not, as some think, an opportunity for reflexive dismissal.  

Choosing a bottom-up, not a top-down, chain-of-command 

Why do workers feel so disrespected at work that it is a prime reason millions of workers are quitting their jobs?  

Many reports that the cause of this feeling is a general sense of incivility at their workplace. When surveyed, 25% of employees “blamed their organization for not providing them with the basic skills they needed.”  

It is unclear what “basic skills” employees are referring to. However, the source of not being provided such skills is quite clear.  

In short, employees do not feel heard by their employers – in fact, four out of five employees feel this way. This feeling is most pronounced among young, essential, and/or workers from under-represented backgrounds.   

Most employers take a top-down approach to managing their employees. This arrangement entails workers taking orders and being held accountable for their execution, by employers.  

Some degree of this, of course, is warranted. But too often this also entails employers ignoring the needs of workers.  

Therefore, something approximating the opposite of a top-down method – namely, a bottom-up method, where employees have the open right to hold employers accountable – is necessary for building and retaining a strong team.  

Reliable research shows that workers that feel listened to perform better at their jobs.  

38% of workers say when they express themselves to their employers about issues of productivity, their ideas are dismissed without being thoroughly considered.   

Employees, however, often have better ways of thinking about workplace-related issues than managers themselves do. This is the philosophy behind the idea of meritocracy, as Bridgewater Associates founder Ray Dalio calls it.   

The sole method of building and retaining a strong team is to take your employees’ ideas and needs seriously – not just in theory, but in practice.   

Doing so will improve their performance, markers of well-being, and overall respect for their employer. Such respect cannot be – nor should it be expected to be – arrived at through presumption alone.  

Respect is earned through respect. In the place of work, such respect will best be earned through implementing a bottom-up method of dialogue between employees and employers.  

Portions of this article originally appeared on the All Work Space website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

What Jobs Will Pay the Most in 2030?

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Are you looking for a job that pays better and will do so for a long time? Are you looking for a job that will provide you the most bang for your buck? If your answer is “yes” then we have the details for you.

Keeping the long-term future in mind is vital in looking for a lucrative job. A job that might be lucrative now might not be as lucrative in 2030. But which jobs will be lucrative by 2030? Which jobs will see the highest increases in employment by 2030?  

Healthcare

The COVID-19 pandemic has proven to be quite devastating to healthcare systems. As a result, healthcare providers are tired, and many are even quitting jobs they’ve had for decades to escape the overwhelming stress.  

Despite this, healthcare will see a massive boom in employment opportunities by 2030. According to The Motley Fool, the most lucrative job of 2030 will be registered nursing (RNs). RNs have projected job growth of 15% over the next decade.  

In the same report, various other professions in the domain of healthcare are mentioned:  

  • Physical Therapists: “The number of physical therapists could increase to 337,000 by 2030, up from nearly 217,000 last year.” 
  • Nurse Practitioners: “Employment for nurse practitioners is expected to grow from 150,000 last year to 205,000 by 2030.” 
  • Physician Assistant: “There were around 104,000 physician assistant positions in the U.S. last year. By 2030, that number could rise to more than 144,000.”

In each case, The Motley Fool determines the “lucrativeness” of each position not by its salary but by job growth. In each case, however, healthcare jobs are well-paying –in the positions mentioned above, salaries range from $80,000-$110,000.  

Software development

Software development will be the most lucrative STEM job by 2030. Indeed, more accurately, it is slated to remain the most lucrative STEM job by 2030, as it is currently the most lucrative. Various sources agree with this projection or one that is similar. For example, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of jobs in software development will increase by 22% from 2020 to 2030.  

Other Industries

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the following jobs will be the fastest-growing (in terms of increased employment) industries from now until 2030:  

  • Motion picture projectionists (70.5%) 
  • Wind turbine service technicians (68.2%) 
  • Ushers, lobby attendants, and ticket takers (61.8%) 
  • Solar photovoltaic installers (52.1%) 
  • Cooks at restaurants (48.9%) 
  • Agents and business managers of artists, performers, and athletes (46.3%) 
  • Costume attendants (44.3%)  
  • Exercise trainers and group fitness instructors (39.3%)

The most lucrative jobs require more significant skill acquisition on the part of workers.  

For job seekers, what is essential to keep in mind about all of these growing positions is that almost all of them require specific training. To acquire these jobs, you will be required to gain skills through either certificates, experience, or schooling.  

Therefore, success in the future of work will be determined by how much workers are willing to expand their skill-set. Likewise, those who are willing to further their education will reap the benefits of these growing fields.  

Portions of this article originally appeared on the All Work Space website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Scientific Ways to Improve Your Relationship

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

How to Attract Talent in a Competitive Job Market

Companies need to attract the best and the brightest talent to position themselves for continued and new success. Here’s a look at what organizations can do to differentiate themselves as top employers and ensure they’re attracting top talent in 2022.

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The Great Resignation

Across industries and demographics, people quit their jobs in 2021. According to data by people analytics firm Visier, 1 in 4 employees left their roles. While it’s certainly common to see some professional turnover, particularly among younger employees, they weren’t the only ones changing things up in 2021. The most significant increase in resignation rates were employees between 30 and 45 years old, with an average increase of more than 20% between 2020 and 2021. While organizations are eager to fill vacant roles, many potential employees are not yet ready to return to the workforce. Plummeting employment figures, paired with low reports of job searching among the unemployed, have shifted the economic landscape in favor of workers. With so many jobs available, workers are optimistic about their job opportunities and are comfortable waiting for the most suitable role and opportunity.

What Employees Want

The biggest lesson over the past few years is that employees want more from their employers, and they won’t accept less. Flexibility is paramount: according to PWC’s Workforce Pulse Survey, nearly half of Gen Z (45%) and millennial (47%) employees surveyed said they are willing to give up 10% or more of their future earnings in exchange for the option to work virtually from almost anywhere. No longer required to live within commuting distance of the workplace, many workers have relocated to areas that better suit their lifestyles. While most employees still find networking and professional value in going into the office, they want to do it only part of the week, and during times that work best for them. Workers are also eyeing more time off. According to McKinsey’s future of work-study, 65% of employees left their jobs to restore work-life balance. Employees are burnt out and searching for opportunities that provide a greater sense of consistency in their lives. This goes beyond vacation time and manageable work hours. The feeling of being valued and connected is crucial. Employees want to work for a company that prioritizes outcomes over output and supports holistic wellbeing. Being trusted and valued by their manager and company in an environment where they’re given the autonomy to work independently is vital. In addition, the potential to grow is incredibly desirable. Employees want to learn new skills to grow their careers and see it as imperative to their future career path.

What this Means for Employers

Across industries, workers are redefining what they need to work successfully. To remain competitive, employers need to focus on the overall employee experience and workplace strategy, including things like increasing investment to ensure employees can collaborate no matter their location. Connection will be key: technology-enabled collaboration spaces and training programs will bring together remote and on-site team members and encourage cross-service line engagement. To demonstrate their commitment to wellbeing, organizations should implement or expand policies around employee time off, mental health, and community engagement. Finally, to successfully roll out these initiatives and attract new employees, managers need to be equipped with soft-skills training and hybrid team management practices to foster a dynamic and productive work environment.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Cresa website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

A Workaholic’s Guide to Relaxing on Vacation

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.6 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.