How To Improve Your Memory

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Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

How To Improve Communication While Working From Home

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Whether it’s differences in time zones, poor internet connections or a lack of experience with online platforms, a variety of challenges can occur. Fortunately, there are a few simple ways to overcome communication challenges while working from home:

1. Practice New Tools

One major challenge of online communication is being unfamiliar with the tools required. While many of your employees may be somewhat familiar with video conferencing solutions, they might not be using them to their full potential.

For example, basic video conferencing etiquette like instructing employees to mute the line when they’re not speaking can make calls much simpler. Likewise, more specific skills — such as sharing screens — can make it easier for people to explain their point or question. Additionally, don’t expect everyone to be at the same level of familiarity with these tools initially, and provide training or resources where possible. It’s a small thing, but it will make a big difference.

2. Keep a Schedule, But Be Flexible

Not everyone can work at the same time. But, having a regular schedule can help avoid any problems that might otherwise occur. Specifically, if your colleagues know when you’re available, they can prioritize any urgent requests during those hours. Similarly, they also won’t become frustrated at a lack of response outside of those times.

Scheduling in this way is particularly helpful for employees with diverse responsibilities. For example, some employees interact with contacts across multiple time zones or have other commitments outside of work. Therefore, being flexible will maintain high employee morale — as long as people are clear about when they’re available.

3. One Size Doesn’t Fit All

Naturally, people have different preferences regarding communication. Some flourish in a video call, while others prefer text-based communication. And, we all know those team members who do everything by email or instant messaging. So, to get the best out of your employees, determine their preferences and strengths and work with them.

For example, video calls can be stressful for many people and the lack of body language can be challenging. At the same time, others may struggle to interpret tone over email and, as such, may prefer the ease of a phone call.

Consequently, working with people — and not against them — is the best way to foster good communication. What’s more, being considerate in this way will be particularly appreciated during the present crisis, when maintaining good mental health is especially difficult.

4. Address Issues Early

Don’t let small problems develop into larger ones. For instance, figure out how to improve call quality before that all-staff meeting. Or, resolve a minor misunderstanding between two individuals before it becomes a team problem. There are enough challenges with online communication as it is. Make sure you don’t add to them!

5. Assume the Best

It’s easy to misinterpret tone through text — especially if you’re stressed or unfamiliar with the person sending the message. However, assuming the best of people can help make communication easier.

If someone sends an email that could be taken two ways — one positive and one negative —try to err on the side of positive. Being generous in your approach can help reduce unnecessary conflict.

6. Expect New Challenges

Expect the unexpected and understand that there will always be new challenges. For example, some people may have been using VoIP at home for years, while others are just now setting it up. Similarly, people’s phone lines are bound to drop in meetings and their internet might go down for a couple of days.

At the same time, coworkers might have children who are now at home, too, or be working in a small apartment with roommates. Being considerate of these challenges will allow your employees to tell you what they need and help them do their best work.

7. Check in Regularly

Regularly checking in on your colleagues is essential. In particular, if you’re managing remote workers, scheduling time for one-on-ones is a good way to confirm that they’re thriving in their new online workplace. These calls also give you a chance to work out some solutions if they’re not.

If you’re not managing a team, checking in with your colleagues is still worthwhile — especially if you’re working on a project together. Strong collaboration is a recipe for success across industries and organizations.

8. Make Time for Conversation

Your communication doesn’t have to be all focused-on work, though. Talking about non-work topics helps teams’ bond and ensures that employees feel valued for more than just their output. This is even more important in stressful times like the pandemic.

As an example, a bit of virtual office gossip can help reduce friction and prevent accidental conflicts. Consider allowing time at the start of a meeting for a bit of a catch-up or check in via instant messaging. However, you do it, just make sure non-work conversation is allowed and, better yet, encouraged.

 This article originally appeared on the Commercial Cafe website.

About The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Keyboard Tricks for Busy People

About The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Tips for Healthy Sleep Habits

About The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Post-Pandemic: Office Space Probably Will Be More Efficient

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People are starting to slowly trickle back to office buildings, but for many companies, the question of how much space they will need in the future is still under discussion.

Some industry players have theorized that corporate downsizing is inevitable now that remote work technologies have been widely adopted. Others say the need for office space remains, especially in the long term.

Companies that have done an office lease over the last 10 years, regardless of industry, have mostly opted to make their space denser and more efficient, Hicks Ventures principal Patrick Hicks said.

“That means less individual work area, more collaborative space, hoteling or whatever you want to call it. So, with this new thing, I would say 90% of them even will have to make their footprint bigger,” Hicks said during a Bisnow webinar.

Hicks said he would be shocked if office occupancies at his properties fell by even 5% from where they were prior to the coronavirus pandemic. Instead, he predicts space usage is more likely to stay the same as an eventual vaccine comes into play and more people return to the office.

Gensler co-Managing Director Stephanie Burritt said she also thinks the overall square footage of most corporate offices will look very similar in the future. The main focus for companies will be reallocating the space and how it functions to provide more distancing.

“It feels like a breakeven right now, what my gut is also telling me,” Burritt said.

CBRE Executive Vice President Jon Lee said that anecdotally, he doesn’t have any clients of significant size that are expanding their footprint.

“Definitely trimming on the margin or reallocating, but I think it’s going to be flat, is my guess,” Lee said.

The economic uncertainty of the pandemic has forced many companies to hold off on deploying capital or making any major changes. But lease renewals are inevitably going to come up during 2021, and many firms will be forced to make a decision.

That has already begun to happen, according to Hicks. Now that office occupancy has returned to about 50% across his portfolio, tenants are more interested in planning for the future.

“Now they’re finally sort of addressing it, as opposed to kicking the can to the last minute,” Hicks said.

Transwestern Senior Managing Director Doug Little said that at the moment, the uncertainty is leading to shorter renewal lease terms.

“While they want to stay in the building, for the most part, we’re not seeing the length of term go out as much as we have in the past. I’ve seen as much as five and 10 [years]. You see more of a shorter-term extension, but we’re hopeful that will change,” Little said.

This article originally appeared on the Bisnow website.

About The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

World’s Most Contagious Falsehoods

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Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

The Role of Technology in Future Workplaces

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As we look to the future of the workplace, and more specifically, the office experience, post-pandemic, it’s clear that technology will play a pivotal role in what these spaces will offer, look like, and how they will operate. Both in-office systems specifically geared towards collaboration, as well as our own personal devices that we use daily, are going to become key tools in not only drawing employees back into the office, but also in ensuring employee safety and well-being. These systems will also be essential to preserving productivity and efficiency in the office in a time when companies have realized that fully remote operations are a possibility.

BYOD: Bring Your Own Device

COVID-19 has led to more technology enablement than ever before, by necessity. As a result, personal mobile devices will undoubtedly become more integrated into the day-to-day workplace experience. Individual users will not only use them to communicate, but to connect with smart systems built within the workplace. Through this integration, personal devices will aid in securing a conference room or a desk space, ordering food for a meeting—really anything needed to prep for a big meeting can now be accomplished from the palm of your hand. These applications will save employees time as well while increasing their productivity.

Furthermore, with the newest office technologies, employees can use their phones to scan into the office, activate, and unlock necessary AV equipment, access their destination dispatch for building elevators, receive important real-time announcements, check real-time parking space availability, and use them for campus wayfinding capabilities—all things that would have required employees to touch surfaces in the past. The seamless way that personal devices dovetail with scheduling software that already exists in the marketplace makes these innovations a no-brainer as people start to transition back to the in-person office.

As wellness continues to be top of mind both at home and in the workplace, personal devices can also be used as an important tool as employees’ well-being is top priority now more than ever. Notifications can be sent out to employees via their phone reminding them to stand up and stretch, take a five-minute mental break, as well as to notify staffers about any other wellness initiatives being implemented throughout the office. This system can also be used to notify employees about the status of office sanitation protocols, giving them much needed peace of mind during a stressful time.

Seamless Video Conferencing

Both on our personal devices and those that are larger, collaborative video technology has been one of the biggest heroes of the pandemic era. Hardly a day goes by where we are not interfacing on Zoom, Microsoft Teams, Google Meet, or any of the other various conferencing technologies on the market. As people return to the office, enhanced meeting capabilities are going to be of utmost importance. Seamless conferencing is crucial, as is being able to key in people who are not in the office when you are. Offices need to transform into a virtual-in-person hybrid without missing a beat—a huge cultural shift aided in large part by workplace technology.

Effective workplaces now and in the future need efficient collaboration technologies that foster seamless conversations both on-site and at home. Ideally, employees will have access to virtual conferencing that is nearly identical to what they have at home, presenting minimal technical difficulty when dialing in. Mirroring the work-from-home experience not only decreases potential technical issues while allowing for attendees to seamlessly be in the office or working remotely while collaborating with one another without batting an eye.

Sustainability and Wellness

Technology also plays an important role in workplace sustainability. Strategically implemented smart systems can gather important data on green performance, informing company decisions for a more environmentally friendly future. Furthermore, technology can be used to easily adjust HVAC filtration and air flow, control sensors improve comfort and operational efficiency and moderate other systems that contribute to an office’s carbon footprint. Using 3D digital replicas of workspaces can create impactful sensory data that shows real-time visualization and analysis of facilities and stores static construction and manufacture documentation on a single source. These green “digital twins” can be instrumental in helping make important decisions about the workspace’s future.

In addition to valuable sustainability initiatives, technology also contributes to important wellness systems that are integral to the current and future employee experience. For example, lighting that mimics natural light patterns to regulate workers’ circadian rhythms, and tech that monitors various occupancy sensors and wall switches, alerting employees when touch becomes too frequent so they can calibrate accordingly. Sensors to measure data for temperature, humidity, CO2, VOC, and sound levels that are displayed on common area digital wellness dashboards promote a culture of care and wellness. As physical and mental health remain priorities for employees and their employers, having a workplace that can respond quickly and with minimal touch to these needs seamlessly will be an essential factor in a long-lasting, sustainable workplace moving forward.

Looking to the Future

The way we work is constantly changing and technology plays a pivotal role in that evolution. The workplace of the future, whatever that may ultimately look like, will inevitably be driven by people and fueled by technology—and with factors like COVID-19 making employers think of new ways to navigate the workplace, having technological solutions that work seamlessly with the office of the future is more important than ever. The workspaces of today and tomorrow must be designed around a user-centric approach—one that prioritizes and invests in the employees’ needs and enables individual productivity and efficiency. Technology and physical spaces must enter into a symbiotic relationship in order to deliver the best experience for both the employee and the company as a whole.

This article originally appeared on the Work Design website.

About The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

How To Get Better At Delegating

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Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

For Productivity and Career Growth The Office is Best

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When you consider productivity and your career, you know it’s not just about working harder. It’s really about being intentional and reflecting on some key elements of your work, your team, and yourself to be your best. In addition, while you may love working in your home office—after all who doesn’t love wearing sweatpants, avoiding the commute and working side-by-side with their furry companion—it may be detracting from your productivity and your career growth.

There are ways you can be more productive and strategic about advancing your career—and showing up at your office may be one of them. When you’re deciding whether to go to your office, consider the nature of the work, your team and your own style—these will help you show up at the office for what matters most—and inform your choices based on great research.

Your Team

Complexity and pressure: Brand new research from Maastricht University and Erasmus University found when people were doing more routine work, online efforts were satisfactory. However, for situations where there was more complexity, pressure and the need for speed, being in person was far superior. Part of the key to productivity is to be intentional about your work and know that the kind of work you’re doing will be impacted by your situation. When work is more complicated, intense or requires swift decision making, choose to be in person with teammates.

Your Team

Your colleagues: Another key study highlighted in the Journal of Labor Economics found positive spillover in performance. The longitudinal study focused on 656 NBA players over a four-year period and found players had a strong influence on each other’s scoring—increasing overall game scores. This is similar to the sociological phenomenon called the Bandwagon Effect in which group energy and the emotion of the crowd inspires team members—resulting in an uptick in activity. Being in person can make you more productive as you obtain energy from others, and you can also positively influence your co-workers as well, through your presence and hard work. All of this is also very good for your career—your effectiveness will get you noticed.

Diversity: We can take a lesson from Darwin and embrace the reality that more diversity tends to make species thrive. University of Toronto research found when natural ecosystems had greater biodiversity, all plants tended to thrive to greater extents. Workplaces are like this as well. To be our best, we must be connected with new thinking, different ideas and alternatives to our own echo chambers. Often these connections are most easily made in the office because it facilitates the hallway conversations and the bump-into-you discussions at the coffee bar or in the work café.

Yourself

Work dynamics: Pay attention to your own work preferences, but don’t assume they are static. It’s typical to over-generalize (“I prefer to work alone, therefore I seek time alone for all tasks.” or “I love people, so the more I’m with others in my work, the better.”) Actually, your effectiveness and productivity will have to do with an interplay of your tasks and your personality. Tune in to how you work best. For some work, you may indeed work better alone and for other work, you may work better with others. But this will likely be a mix and you will be your most productive—and build your most strategic relationships—when you pay attention to the interplay and plan your work accordingly.

Wellbeing: It’s a rare day when a study isn’t released about the decline in wellbeing and the rise in depression, anxiety and mental health issues based on social isolation during the pandemic. Likewise, studies demonstrate when people are depressed their productivity tends to decline and when their depression is treated, productivity improves. Coming into the office and spending time face-to-face with colleagues is good for your mental health and that, in turn, is has positive impacts on productivity.

Social capital: If you want to build relationships that will help you stretch, grow, learn, get things done and advance your career, you’ll be able to do this best face-to-face. You can build social capital virtually, but chances are good your relationships won’t be as tight, and trust may not be as strong. In-person contact has the unique ability to cement bonds because we develop greater familiarity with others, can read body language better and interpret micro expressions more accurately. Social capital can, in turn, help you be more productive because you’ll know how to get things done through the network.

Engagement: Research from the Association for Psychological Science found engagement, satisfaction and productivity are correlated and tend to reinforce each other. When we’re more engaged, we’re more satisfied and productive. When we’re more productive, we tend to be more engaged and satisfied, and so on. This is another reason to come into the office. It’s easier to dive in and engage fully when you’re in person. Without technology issues or the distractions of home, you can be together with colleagues as you work toward common goals—and be more productive doing so.

Working from home can be a wonderful thing, but it’s not a panacea and you may be able to tap into greater productivity and enhanced career growth by going to your office—at least part of the time. When you decide where you’ll work, consider the type of work you’ll be doing and whether it is complex or high-pressure. Also consider your colleagues and the energy you can give and get, as well as the diversity of ideas that will help you think better. Finally consider your own work preferences, wellbeing, social capital and engagement. All of these are helpful lenses through which to view your productivity and your career success—making intentional decisions about where you’ll work and how you can have the greatest impact.

This article originally appeared on the Forbes website.

About The Sundance Company                                                      
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Music To Your Ears

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.