How To Make Yourself Work When You’re Not Feeling It

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The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

A Simplified History of Everything

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Glass Solutions: The Most Desired Workplace Design Element

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Natural light in the workplace is a growing trend, and the use of glass is becoming the go-to solution. But glass can offer more beyond just aesthetics and design. The full ecosystem of glass solutions offers functionality, from the glass itself to the hardware that accompanies it. It enhances the utility of the space you’re working in, allowing for more open communication and line of sight. The use of glass has many benefits in the workplace, from the layout and functionality of the space, to the energy and mood it provides its occupants.

Designing for Wellness

In the workplace, daylighting, the use of natural light to reduce traditional electrical lighting, continues to be increasingly common. Not only does it reduce energy consumption and offer a sustainable option that many consumers are seeking, its impact on personal health can be even greater. Studies show that natural light is proven to boost productivity, improve mood and enhance overall well-being, making it high on the list for increased employee experience and performance. In a recent survey conducted by the HR advisory firm Future Workplace, it found that natural light and views of the outdoors outranked other perks, like onsite cafeterias and fitness centers, as the number one attribute to a workplace environment. While the demand for wellness-based designs continue to grow, workplace design trends are shifting away from being private and enclosed to collaborative and open. Glass makes both – wellness and collaboration – possible.

The office environment often reflects a business’s core values and culture. Companies look to strive for collaboration and transparency, which is why we’re seeing so many new open office layouts. Implementing glass solutions increases employee well-being while also maintaining a collaborative feel, which can result in a positive and healthy work environment that can enhance efficiency, communication and collaboration.

Advancing Sustainable Environments

At the end of 2017, one out of every four dollars under professional management in the United States—$12.0 trillion or more—was invested according to sustainable investing strategies. In fact, estimates show that commercial building owners and managers will invest a projected $960 billion globally to make their existing infrastructure more sustainable between 2015 and 2023 to meet the demand for green buildings. As more facility managers, architects and designers seek to go green and promote a lower carbon footprint, glass is becoming a central tenant.

Electrochromic glass, or “smart glass,” uses electricity to change it from opaque to translucent and can be controlled manually or programmed to adjust according to the position of the sun. Aside from the obvious reduction in energy costs from limiting the use of electrical lighting, automatic shading and design in glass curtain walls help reduce the load on a building’s HVAC unit, further reducing energy use and costs.

Using Glass for Human-Centric Design

From onsite gyms, meditation rooms and more, employers are investing in the health and wellness of their workforce. This includes using the design of the space as a way to improve the human experience. WELL certifications, measuring how buildings promote healthy lifestyles and employee wellness, have become the larger goal for designers.

Through glass, architects and business owners can create a dynamic and human-centric environment that feels authentic to the brand and leaves growth for new innovations.

Historically, glass has had limitations in terms of flexibility in installation – limiting its utility and utilization. With the growth of architectural interest for open office design through high ceilings and tall glass doors, breakthroughs in technology and manufacturing have made it feasible to work with the consistency and weight of glass to fit those larger openings and the relevant dimensions that spaces demand.

The increase in compatible products is enabling even more glass incorporations into new building designs and renovations. This includes panic devices to enable greater safety without disrupting the aesthetic appeal of a glass door, to pivots and door closures that are durable for heavy glass to reduce sound transmissions.

Incorporating glass invites light and fluidity into spaces, while also establishing separate rooms without sacrificing the collaborative feeling needed for today’s workforce. With glass, flexibility is inherent. As workplaces continue to evolve across industries, companies can easily reconfigure their space without having to completely renovate in order to accommodate for new office innovations.

Using Glass for Functional Design

With the use of glass environments increasing, custom design options provide the opportunity to modify functional applications, instead of the traditional, one-size-fits-all approach. This gives buildings and shared spaces the function they need without sacrificing the aesthetic.

Designers can employ shaded or frosted glass as a clean and sophisticated way to create private spaces without closing off an area entirely. For example, conference rooms or individual offices can use these features to increase privacy for potential confidential conversations, while keeping the natural and open feel of the overall space.

Additionally, incorporating color into glass or door hardware is a subtle but especially useful tool for tough to navigate spaces, like schools, hospitals and other commercial buildings, where people visit often but may be unfamiliar with the layout of the building. Using different colored glass doors, hardware and partitions can offer savvier wayfinding navigation through a space, leaving out the not-so-aesthetically pleasing signage or floor maps we’re used to seeing in hospitals or parking garages.

Glass solutions can even reinforce a company’s brand or a school’s colors throughout small spaces or large campuses. Beyond customizing the color of the glass, itself, hardware options can also offer a unique solution. From door rails and pulls, to panic devices and new finishes, like matte black, building owners can strengthen brand identity by aligning with the colors in their brand guidelines.

Glass plays a functional role with security as well. In older building designs, glass was used as a security feature, allowing visitors to be seen through doors and walls. Today, electronic access control (EAC) solutions incorporate security software and seamlessly integrate into glass openings for enhanced protection, beyond line of sight.

When it comes to design and functionality, the extent of decorative options and customizations should not be overlooked when thinking through the workplace layout. The desire for bright, open spaces will continue to rise. Through innovations in the glass industry, architects and builders are able to make their design aspirations come true. And beyond design and aesthetic, glass can be customized and enhanced for security and natural light to increase safety, productivity, communication and improve the overall workplace experience.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the WorkDesign Magazine website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

The History of the World’s Tallest Freestanding Structures

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The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Nine Words and Phrases You’re Probably Using Wrong

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Many times, especially in business settings, people use words that they think they know — but don’t. Although they do this in an effort to sound intelligent and sophisticated, it backfires badly, because even one small slip-up can cause an audience to focus on only that, not the speaker’s ideas. Sure, saying the wrong word (usually) isn’t a game-changer. But if you make that kind of mistake, it sets you up for a question that no one wants clients, coworkers, or employers to begin asking: “Are you really that smart?”

Think it can’t happen to you? We’ve heard horror stories: people laughing behind a prominent CEO’s back for his not understanding the correct use of a business term; a corporate lawyer saying “tenant” (a renter) instead of “tenet” (a belief); an employee toasting her supervisor as the “penultimate” leader (which doesn’t mean “ultimate” but instead means “next to last”).

Here, excerpted from our new book, That Doesn’t Mean What You Think It Means, are nine terms or words that sound smart but when used incorrectly make you sound the opposite, along with real examples of their being misused, drawn from business news reports, research publications, and corporate press releases. (We’ve omitted attributions to protect the well-meaning writers who unwittingly committed the errors)

begs the question

“Fidelity might have fired the last salvo by eliminating fees entirely. This begs the question as to whether Fidelity’s new funds incur any hidden costs or fees.”

In spite of popular thought, “begs the question” is not a smart-sounding way of saying “raises the question.” It’s actually a formal logic term that means trying to prove something based on a premise that itself needs to be proved. So leave “begs the question” where it technically belongs — in the realm of logic and law — and use the (correct) “raises the question” when that’s what you’re trying to say.

impacts on

“They can clearly and simply explain what we have done and how it impacts on our interpretation of the data, ensuring our reports are understandable and actionable.”

In a 2015 American Heritage Dictionary survey of language experts, 79% disapproved of using “impacts on” to mean “affect.” Another 39% disapproved of using “impact” to mean “affect” even without that preposition “on.” The original (and still most common) meaning of “impact” involves collisions. But nowadays, you can use it to mean “to affect” (without any collisions). But leave out that preposition “on.” That might impact (affect) your business presentation.

in regard(s) to

“[I]n regards to the new well, the production capacity of this first large size production well is remarkable.” 

This sentence is wrong. Not regarding the remarkable production capacity, but regarding “in regards to,” which should be “in regard to.” Even better, just say “regarding” or “about.” (For the record, “regards” with the “s” is correct in the phrase “as regards,” where “regard” is a verb.) In regard to the phrase “in regard to,” regard is a noun, and the singular — without the s — should always be used. The exception is when sending someone good wishes — “best regards” — or when giving your regards to, say, Broadway, as in the song. After all, you probably wouldn’t want to wish Broadway only one regard.

less/fewer

“[S]tart-ups are leaving the heartland and are employing less people.

Technically, at least according to some word snobs, it should be “fewer people,” not “less people.” Why? It all depends on if and what you’re counting. A few basic rules:

  • Use “fewer” for numbered, countable things, especially people or other plural nouns. (“Fewer than 20 people were there.”)
  • Use “less” for things that can’t be counted, at least reasonably. (“There’s less sand at the beach.”)
  • Use “less” with numbers when they are a single or total unit, usually with “than.” (“Less than 50 percent of us went to the meeting.”) This can be tricky, because often you’ll see numbers in the plural — as in “He has less than a million dollars” — that presumably have been counted (as in rule 1). But since here we’re really talking about total amounts of nonhuman things, use less. (Don’t blame us — those are the basic rules that many people follow. Still, it’s all less — not fewer! — difficult than you’d think.)

methodology

“We have…failed to require that the IRS utilize only secure and reliable authentication methodologies…” 

Methodology is an annoying word that has oozed into a lot of places, especially government documents and annual reports, probably because it sounds important…and pretentious. The word to use instead is “method.” The “-logy” tacked onto the end of method transforms it into the study of methods. (That -logy ending comes from the ancient Greek λογίa for “the study of.”) So methodology has its place in English — it’s just that it should stay there and not substitute for method. (One interesting note: The IRS itself, in contrast to the senator speaking about the IRS, almost always uses the word method instead of methodology. Count on tax professionals to use a more economical word.)

moot

“Whether you need to appoint a Data Protection Officer or not is a mute-point.”

Actually, it’s not a mute point at all, because a point isn’t speechless. It should be moot, not mute. But even spelled right, moot is tough to use correctly. The use of moot is, well, moot…and we’re not being cute. What we’re saying is that the meaning of moot is “open to debate” — which is the time-honored definition of moot. But by the mid-1800s, moot also began meaning “something not worth considering.” The idea was that something debatable is of no practical value, so not worth bothering with. So sometimes moot is used to mean “definitely not debatable” because the point is so immaterial. This change in meaning is primarily North American, and it is one that has stuck, although language purists argue about it. Our advice: Choose another word.

statistically significant

Facebook is ‘a positive, significant predictor of divorce rate….’ [T]he study’s authors feel they’re noticing something that’s genuinely statistically significant.”

You see it all the time nowadays: A study has shown something worrisome! The findings are statistically significant! Uh-oh! But statistically significant doesn’t necessarily mean that the results were significant in the sense of “Wow!” It just means that they signify that whatever was observed has only a low probability of being due to chance. The problem is, in non-statistical use, significant means something noteworthy or important. So non-statistical types see “statistically significant” and think it refers to something big. But actually, a study can find something statistically significant that has only a tiny effect. For example, Facebook could increase the risk of divorce by a statistically significant 1%. Big deal.

unique

“The Skyline Group of Companies is one of Canada’s fastest-growing and most unique investment management organizations…

Unique means being the “only one of its kind; unlike anything else.” So, something can’t be the “most unique” — it can only be unique. But times are changing. Some dictionaries, like Merriam-Webster, now also define unique as “extraordinary,” although Merriam-Webster does say that this “common usage is still objected to by some.” Include us in the ranks of the “some” (although we’re not as impassioned as the New York Times book reviewer who called this usage of unique an “indefensible outrage!”). Let’s keep unique meaning, well, unique. For plural things that we want to call unique, we can instead say “unusual” or “exceptional.” So we could say that Skyline is an “exceptional” investment management organization…but let’s leave that to the PR department.

utilize

“Among the goals of the partnership will be to utilize Vium’s technology to track digital biomarkers…”

Substitute “used” for “utilized.” Does it make a difference? The only one we can see is that utilized is longer. So why use it? Yes, “utilize” can be distinguished from “use” when something is serving a purpose that it wasn’t intended for (“She utilized her dead tablet as a doorstop”), but it’s a slight distinction and “use” can still work. Utilize can also mean “to convert to use,” most often in scientific writing. (“The body utilizes carbohydrates.”) Even here, use can work, although it sounds a lot less scientific for some reason. In general, utilize is just a fancy way of saying use, and is usually best not  used at all.

These nine words are only the tip of an iceberg. From “a priori” to “untenable,” words can work for you or against you. And that’s our last (not penultimate!) word, at least in this article, on the words that can trip you up.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the HBR website.

 

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

 

How To Organize Your Office For Maximum Productivity

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The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

Survey: Physical Office Space Is Indispensable

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The death of the office may have been a short-lived and heavily rebutted theory to come from the coronavirus outbreak, but there are plenty of businesses that have taken the opportunity of lockdown to permanently, for now at least, close offices in favor of employees working from home.

However, according to a new survey of 65,000 real estate advisor Savills‘ clients, some 89% of respondents believe that retaining physical space is vital for business.

Despite this indication, further results show that its far from business as usual for workplaces.

While many are clear that office design will change going forward to adapt to a post-COVID mindset, focusing more on social distancing areas for shared learning, the study suggests that this will not affect the overall demand for office space significantly.

While 62% of respondents currently operate in towns or cities, the study suggests that this could fall by 23% based on preferences expressed. This would see increases in working from home and working in rural areas.

For future generations of talent, the office has been identified previously as a key area in which workers can be attracted and retained, and this stands for the working world after the coronavirus outbreak too. 25% of 18-24-year old’s expect to spend no time working from home, down from 50% pre-coronavirus, but still representing the largest proportion of all age groups.

“The experience of remote or home working has been felt very differently by people across social and age groups. The consensus is that mental and physical health, personal growth and a separation between home and work life must be supported in both locations. Ultimately video conferencing is no substitute for face-to-face contact,” says Jeremy Bates, executive director and head of occupier services EMEA.

There is also a correlation between the distance employees have to commute and their work from home experience, suggesting a ‘hub and spoke’ model making using of regional and local offices could be a way forward.

Interestingly, up to 67% of people said they’d be willing to desk share again, once it became safe to do so. However, this study does not consider shifting attitudes from the beginning of the lockdown to now.

Bates continues: “Ultimately, it is important to note that the survey results are a reflection of how people felt early on during lockdown and this is likely to change now that restrictions are beginning to lift. This is why we must continue to survey opinion even once the worst of Covid-19 is behind us.”

Portions of this article originally appeared on the On Office Magazine website.

 

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

 

Psychological Tricks To Get You Spend More Money

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The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

 

How To Stay Better Connected To Colleagues and Clients

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With the sudden and critical need for social distancing, most companies are adapting in ways they had not anticipated. For knowledge workers, this includes a mass transition to working from home. While many organizations had offered remote working prior to coronavirus, most still required people to come into the office for face-to-face interaction, and the vast majority of organizations still utilize in-person meetings as the most effective way to connect and communicate with clients.

Now that in-person contact isn’t as feasible, how do you maintain meaningful and productive connections with your colleagues and clients? You can address this question by focusing on the following three areas:

1) Communication tools

We work with a wide range of clients around the globe and utilize a number of traditional and new technologies to stay connected with them. Many of the existing modes of communication—email, phone, text, videoconferencing—still apply and will continue to be used with greater frequency.

Some new tools, or previously less-used platforms, are also being utilized. The sudden transition to working remotely has led to the widespread adoption of Microsoft Teams as a tool that allows people to collaborate internally on projects. We are seeing clients also make use of new platforms and communication protocols in response to the COVID-19 disruption.

If there was ever a time for experimenting with new digital work tools, this is it. We are exploring several new platforms for virtual collaboration and brainstorming with both colleagues and clients. These include tools such as Mural, Miro, Conceptboard, and others. A willingness to experiment and the patience to learn how to use new tools are crucial in this time of change.

2) Proactive communication and troubleshooting

A lot of people, including your clients, are still working from home. Given all the uncertainty of today’s environment, clients have appreciated a proactive approach to communication. A quick phone call to check-in and touch base (and foster some social interaction!) can go a long way. Transitioning to shorter, more frequent discussions also have been useful given the speed of today’s changing context. In some cases, for example, a standing bi-weekly meeting has transitioned into a shorter weekly call.

Anticipating what your clients are concerned about and focusing your attention on that perspective is important. For a lot of office building projects, marketing and leasing are crucial. How can the projects your clients are working on now be best positioned for success following the pandemic? For interior spaces, how can we create user experiences that are thinking about public health and hygiene habits, such as touch-free experiences, sanitation, and increased opportunities for handwashing? Helping clients think through these new criteria is part of your role as advisors. While no one has all the answers, we can help make sure we are asking the right questions.

3) Personal connections and camaraderie

Virtual communication tends to be easiest with people you already know and requires a bit more practice for newer relationships. Trying to focus on the basics of human-to-human communication can help. You can do this by assuming people have a positive intent, asking clarifying questions, and trying to ensure all parties feel comfortable communicating in the medium of choice.

Lastly, remember that we are all going through this together, professionally and personally. Reaching out to clients to ask how they’re coping can be helpful. So, too, is sharing humor or personal details about your daily predicaments, such as why there are children’s voices in the background of a video call or how the barking in the background is just the dog’s way of saying he too wants to join the discussion.

In short, these are not typical times and the typical and traditional modes of professional communication no longer apply. Yet by rethinking your approach, this time of social distancing may actually help you become better connected to your colleagues and your clients in a meaningful way.

Portions of this article originally appeared on the Work Design Magazine website.

The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.

 

Live Long: What Really Extends Lifespan

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The Sundance Company                                                                
Established in 1976, The Sundance Company has the experience to help you with your commercial real estate needs throughout the Boise Valley. If your requirements include property management, leasing, real estate development, project planning, construction or space planning then look to us. The Sundance Company has more than 1.5 million square feet of office and industrial space available in prime locations in the Boise metropolitan area. More information is available at www.sundanceco.com or 208.322.7300.